SCEGGS DARLINGHURST

Primary Sport

Primary Athletics Carnival
Congratulations to all the Primary girls for a fabulous effort at the Athletics Carnival yesterday. It was wonderful to see so much participation in the field events, and optional 800m.

Thank you also to the teachers and coaches who worked very hard on the day to ensure things ran smoothly.

Congratulations again to everyone.

NEW RECORDS 2019

    Name   
House Event   Old Record  
  New Record 
  Anjola Petrie 
Barton  800m 10 Years 
3:09.35 2:57.90
    Nancy Newton    
    Langley   
   800m 11 Years   
2:55.73 2:54.86
 

    Age Champions  
  Name  House     Points   
8/9 Years Rosie Pallet Docker 38
10 Years      Camille Coonan         Christian   44
11 Years Alexandra Tavendale Docker 36
12 Years Stella Argyrides Badham 46
 

   Primary Championship  
Name House
Open 100m     Isla Hootman 0:15.02        Langley   

 

   Primary Running Cup    Name   Points  
  House 

Awarded to the
person who achieved
the most individual
points

 1st   Stella Argyrides       46  Badham
 2nd  Stella Manos  44  Langley
 2nd  Camille Coonan  44    Christian 

 

PRIMARY ATHLETICS HOUSE WINNER

     Place                  House                  Total Points    
1st Langley 406
2nd Docker 351
3rd Christian 311
4th Barton 301
5th Badham 297
5th Beck 262
 

The squad for the IPSHA Athletics Team will be announced at the end of week 8.

A reminder that the Primary 1500m will be run at Athletics training on Monday 17 June at ES Marks Athletic field. The girls will take the bus to the field after school. Pick up at the field is at 4.50pm or outside the Sports Hall at approximately 5.20pm. Please email me suephillips@sceggs.nsw.edu.au if you would like your daughter to participate.

                Primary 100m Champion I. Hootman. Overall Primary Champion S. Argyrides. Equal 2nd C. Coonan and S. Manos         Age Champions. R. Pallett C. Coonan A. Tavendale Z. Argyrides                

 Langley House leaders

 

IPSHA Touch Football and Year 3 Minkey Trials
Trials for Term III sport will be held at Moore Park, Cnr Robertson Road, on Tuesday 24 June. The girls will take the bus from SCEGGS to Moore Park at 3.15pm and can be picked up at the field at 4.50pm or return to school on the bus, arriving at the SCEGGS Sports Hall at approximately 5.20pm. Please ensure your daughter is wearing her SCEGGS Sports uniform and has a large water bottle.

Year 3
Girls will not be able to participate if they do not have a mouth guard and shin pads. Mouth guards can be purchased at the chemist and moulded at home. Hockey sticks can be purchased at large sports stores. The top of the stick should be in line with the waist when the stick is resting vertically on the ground.

 

 
Secondary Sport

Years 7-12 Athletics Carnival
ES Marks Field, Tuesday 18 June 2019


Roll Call: All students are to arrive at school as usual in correct sports uniform in time for Roll Call in their Form room at 8.20am.

Travel Arrangements: Since the Carnival may be cancelled if there is likelihood of rain it is essential that all students make their way to school and travel by hired coaches. No student is permitted to make her own way to the Carnival.

The School will leave ES Marks Field at approximately 2.30pm. All girls will be taken back to school on the buses. Under no circumstance can any girl make her own way home until dismissed after the return to school. If parents are present at the Carnival students may be dismissed at the conclusion of the Carnival, after contact has been made between the parent and the Form Teacher.

Uniform: Girls must wear their correct school sports uniform which can include a T-shirt in their House colours.
A school sports hat, sunscreen, and school jumper and/or school tracksuit, must be brought to the Carnival. Students will be sitting in an exposed area which can get very cold.

Lunch: There are no canteen facilities. All girls must bring their own lunch and plenty of water to drink during the day. No girl will be allowed outside the area for any reason.

Behaviour: SCEGGS has been very fortunate to have the opportunity to use the ES Marks Field. The staff at the venue have been very co-operative and helpful. Please return their hospitality by showing thoughtful behaviour.

Generally: There are to be no electronic devices, phones, Tablet PCs etc and definitely no chewing gum. Just bring your House spirit and participate enthusiastically.

All girls must sit in their allocated areas when they arrive at the venue.

NOTE: House Officials and competitors in the first three events will leave school on the first bus.

Sports Training/Rehearsals: There will be no sports trainings on the day.

There will be NO Secondary Music co-curricular rehearsals on the day of the Carnival.

St Peter’s Players will go ahead as scheduled.

Wet Weather: Be fully prepared for wet weather (umbrellas, raincoats, etc.). In the case of extremely inclement weather a decision will be made at 8.00am. If WET WEATHER results in the cancellation of the Carnival, we will operate on the Day 2 Timetable. Girls should be as prepared as possible for the day, although we will understand if they are not able to have every single thing they need for the four lessons!



Good luck to all Houses.

 Alison Gowan
Director of Sport

 

 

 

St Peter’s Players – Semester II New Directions

St Peter’s Players will take on new structure and content in Semester II. Exciting new classes include Dance and Acting for Camera. For the first time, we also welcome Year 5 to the St Peter’s Players experience. Participation will require re-enrolment and an indication of class selection(s). Correspondence communicating the revised format of our co-curricular program is available in the attached document. You will find the dates of all classes and our Tutor profiles.

Students are requested to submit their enrolment form to me no later than Monday June 17. Confirmation of classes will then be communicated in the last week of term.

Audition Notice - Savings SCEGGS
SCEGGS Darlinghurst will present Saving SCEGGS by Linden Wilkinson in Term IV. The play examines a critical chapter in the history of SCEGGS and will be a perfect way to enter the schools 125th celebrations in 2020.

Ms Eddi Goodfellow will be directing.

Auditions will be conducted at SCEGGS, St Peter’s Playhouse on Wednesday June 19 and Friday June 21 from 4.00pm to 6.00pm. Please note that the audition will take the form of a workshop and all applicants will audition together. You need not prepare anything but cold reads will be given on the day.

Callback auditions will be conducted on Tuesday June 25. Applicants will be contacted by email on Friday June 21 if they have received a callback audition and will be required to prepare an allocated speech.

The production will feature a cast of students from years 7 to 11 and you are invited to express your interest in auditioning. Please email your intention to audition to petereyers@sceggs.nsw.edu.au and include a headshot (this is only for identification purposes and may be taken with mobile phone or your school photo), some detail about your performance experience and your preferred audition day.

Production dates: Thursday November 21 to Saturday November 23 at 7.00pm. Saturday November 23 at 3.00pm

Venue: The Great Hall – SCEGGS Darlinghurst.

 

BTGG 2019 06 06 Drama Saving SCEGGS

 

 

Drama Tour: New York and Chicago – Booking extended
The Drama Department will be running a tour to the U.S.A. in April 2020. The tour is for girls in Years 10, 11 or 12 in 2020. You do not need to be a Drama student.

Date for deposits and Booking forms has now been extended to Thursday June 20.

Extension is not possible after this date. Please contact me for a Booking Form.


Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
All seats have now been taken for this excursion.

 

A Chorus Line: Opening Night - Thursday June 13
Huge "Chookas" to cast, crew and orchestra of our 2019 School Musical, A Chorus Line. Final preparations have realised an excellent production. The nuance, skill and passion that the students have committed to this very sophisticated work has been extraordinary. You are in for a real treat.

Thank you to the boys from Grammar, Knox and Shore who have completed the cast. And grateful thanks to parents and teachers who have supported the students through this experience. This musical, in particular, has been a taxing production physically and emotionally. All participants have risen to the challenge.

Tickets may be obtained from The Seymour Centre box office.



BTGG 2019 06 06 Drama A Chorus Line Poster

“Music blows lyrics up very quickly, and suddenly they become more than art. They become pompous and they become self-conscious ... I firmly believe that lyrics have to breathe and give the audience's ear a chance to understand what's going on. Particularly in the theater, where you not only have the music, but you've got costume, story, acting, orchestra. There's a lot to take in.” 
― 
Stephen Sondheim (Composer)


Peter Eyers
Head of Drama

 

 

Congratulations to Elizabeth Armour (Year 12) who is one of four students selected for a masterclass with Margaret Crawford in the Australian Flute Festival. This is a wonderful learning opportunity for Elizabeth who currently preparing her HSC Music 1 Performance program.

Year 11 Preliminary Music 1 and Music 2
Year 12 HSC Music 1 and 2/Extension Concerts
Well done to Year 11 and 12 students who performed in their respective class concerts. Year 11 students presented one piece each and Year 12 students presented two pieces each from their performance programs. Thank you to the class teachers Year 11 – Ms Alison Ryan (Music 1) and Ms Stephanie Holmes (Music 2), Mr Peter Jewitt (HSC Music 2) for their work preparing the students. Special thank you to Ms Heidi Jones for her accompaniment.

Contemporary Strings – Ardency Trebartha
Well done to the members of the Contemporary Strings ensemble who performed a short lunch time concert for the residents of Ardency Trebartha. The audience were delighted by the performance and it was a lovely way for the students to share their music with the wider community. Thank you to Mrs Anne Sweeney (Director of Strings) for her preparation and direction of the performance.


Strings at Ardency Trebartha

No rehearsals on Tuesday 18 June for Secondary Ensembles
Due to the Athletics Carnival on Tuesday 18 June, there will be no rehearsals for Van Reyk Percussion Ensemble, Clarion Concert Band and Contemporary Strings.
Morning rehearsal for Bugles’ Band will take place as usual.

Upcoming performances:
Primary Piano Concert
Friday 21 June, Great Hall 3:30 – 4:15pm

Amati Strings Performance
Wednesday 19 June, RPA 12:30 – 1:30pm

SSO MTM Concert – Years 11 and 12 Music 1
Thursday 20 June, SOH 6 – 8:30pm

String Studio Concerts
Monday 24 to Wednesday 26 June, Primary Music Rooms 3:30 – 4:15pm

Pauline Chow
Head of Music

 

 

SPAN’s Women in Business and Finance networking event was held last Tuesday. Guests ranging from current students and teachers to Old Girls were privileged to hear from Sally Auld, Chief Economist and Head, AUS/NZ Fixed Income and FX Strategy at JP Morgan.


Sally Auld JOW 190402 0902 2Sally Auld


Year 7 student Catherine Park provides an account of the evening below:

Dr Sally Auld is clearly a woman ahead of her time. She holds a distinguished position in the male-dominated field of economics, yet she doesn’t work in the industry because she believed it would give her a stable job; she does so because she has a passion for economics. And this enthusiasm is what makes her a truly remarkable person.

Last Tuesday, she delivered an insightful SPAN talk to an appreciative audience. The topics included the nature of the economics industry, her ideas about leadership, her life experiences and female representation. And yet, she still managed to provide countless take away messages all in ten minutes.

When she talked about her experience at JP Morgan, she provided a rather surprising fact. Women there make up only 20% of the workforce, and not many hold high-ranking positions. More hopefully, she discussed opportunities for women such as scholarships or looking for competent women in the industry and inviting them in.

As a natural SCEGGS feminist, I held a glass of orange juice in one hand and a microphone in the other and asked a pressing question; how will organic change come about so that women can feel comfortable joining male-dominated industries such as STEM or economics?

Dr Auld replied with a truthful, insightful response – organic change is happening, but it is not happening fast. She said that people are hired based on ability, not gender, yet women are sometimes intimidated by the male-dominant workforce or are not recruited based on their ability. She then offered a very notable piece of advice; if you want something, you must ask for it.

As the talk ended and the mingling began with an excess of snacks, tea and coffee, I began to think. I personally aspire to work in the Science industry which is, however, male dominated. And I now know that when I leave the school gates for the last time as a student at the end of 2024, the door-knocking will start for me.

These SPAN talks are one of a kind. They are home to a range of inspirational speakers who are unique, and these nights are a time to share tips, tricks and experiences. For me, they inspire, educate and entertain, and give me a new-found insight into industries outside of school.

And I will definitely be attending the next one!

 

 

 

 

coloursforcambodiasavethedate 003

  

A charity initiative of the Cambodian House Building Team 2019. Raising funds for local projects in the villages where the SCEGGS team will be working.

More information will follow next week!

 

 Margaret Nilon
Social Justice Co-ordinator

 

 

BTGG 20190613 Refugee Week Logo

Refugee Week is Australia’s peak annual activity to inform the public about refugees and celebrate positive contributions made by refugees to Australian society. The first Refugee Week events were organised in Sydney in 1986 by Austcare. In 1987, the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) became a co-organiser of the week, which became a national event from 1988. In 2001, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) coordinated the first World Refugee Day. The 2019 theme for Refugee Week in Australia is #WithRefugees.

The Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) is the peak body supporting 200 organisations and 900 individual members who work to support the needs of refugees. You can read more about the work of the RCOA here. One of the organisations supported by RCOA is the House of Welcome at Granville. The House of Welcome provides support for asylum seekers living in the community by providing practical assistance in a variety of different ways. One such means includes their Food Bank where those with limited or no income can access familiar and nutritious food, as well as other important non-food items.

How can we help? The shelves very quickly run dry and the House of Welcome has trouble keeping up with the demand. In response, SCEGGS is running a K-12 food and non-food item drive in the last weeks of term, beginning on Monday June 17. More information about the House of Welcome can be found here http://www.houseofwelcome.com.au/.

It would be wonderful to deliver in abundance to the House of Welcome at the end of term. Items are specified below by year group. Thank you in anticipation for your generosity.

Distribution of items

Year Group Item(s)
K-2 Honey, jam
3-4 Canned tuna (in oil), canned tomatoes, canned chickpeas, canned corn (not creamed), canned fruit
5-6 Instant noodles, basmati rice
7 Savoury biscuits
8 Shampoo & conditioner
9

Deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush

10 Sugar, flour
11 Laundry detergent, dishwashing liquid
12 Coffee, tea, cooking oil

Please note: We pay heed to the wishes, habits and palates of those receiving our donated goods and respectfully request that you do not supply soup, baked beans or tinned spaghetti.

Margaret Nilon, Social Justice Coordinator and
Year 8 Form Classes

 

 

A window into the past
Hi there, I’m Emily, the new intern in the Business Office. As an intern, I find myself doing a myriad of tasks all for the purpose of gaining experience and lending a hand. One of these tasks is aiding Prue Heath in Archives.

Now to begin with, I believe the Archives office should not be named an Archives office at all, naming it a Treasure Trove, or a Brief History of 20th Century Australia would be much more appropriate.

Whilst I am only cataloguing the public research files, there have been gems of interesting information hiding between the yellowing envelopes - newspaper clippings, letters and diaries - which shine a light on the lives of ex-students, ex-teachers and their families.

One life these records took me to, was Kate Waddy. Whilst only here a brief time, Kate attended SCEGGS from 1899 to 1900. Kate wrote letters to a friend regarding her life as a SCEGGS Boarder.



Archive Article Kate Waddy Letters October 1889

Now Kate regarded the Boarding House as a “prison”. Although it seems to me, reading these letters, the Boarders had a rather full and exciting agenda. For example, they undertook leisurely visits to Bondi Beach and Manly with a spot of paddling and a picnic; played tennis, rowed with the girls and travelled into town for shopping, painstakingly deciding on a fancy dress for the upcoming ball.

Of course, the trials of a teenager don’t finish there. I couldn’t help but grin when she wrote to her friend “I am sure Keith Doyle never saw me kiss Fred Haydon”. Or wondering who sent her an anonymous invitation to The King’s School sporting event. Or sending apologies to Bruce as she didn’t invite him to a dance – on account of him not enjoying dancing.

These adventures were not faced alone. One of the frequent characters in Kate’s letters is Pearl Haydon. They become roommates in Kate’s second year at SCEGGS. It isn’t long till they are arranging camping trips for the school holidays, and Kate is having to wait for her one afternoon as “Pearl bought nearly every shop out”.

Another frequent character is James Hilton Doyle. Hilton as he preferred to be called, was a friend from her childhood who offered Kate a bit of friendly tennis rivalry and was a bike riding companion, With a little deduction, I discovered Hilton was also later to be Pearl’s husband.

It seems to me that the life Kate lived in the 19th Century was not so unfamiliar as a teenage girl from the 21st Century might live today.

Certainly, the vernacular and fashion might be quite different, although I can picture Kate on the train to Town Hall, shopping in Pitt Street Mall or even down at the beach with Pearl and her friends.

Emily Buckley
SCEGGS Intern

 

 

As we have some extra copies, if families would like a further copy of Lux from either last year or 2017, they are welcome to purchase one or more copies from Student Services. This offer remains open until the end of Term II, after which extra copies will be recycled.

 

 


P & F Events
   
     
Thursday 13 June
  Year 3 Class Parent Cocktail Party
 7.00pm    Private Home
 Cost    $60 (covers food and drink)
 Online Booking   Details to come
     
     
Sunday 16 June   Year 7 Class Parent
Barefoot Bowling & Burgers
1.00pm-5.00pm   The Greens Bowling Club, North Sydney
RSVP   14 June
Online Booking   Year 7 Barefoot Bowling & Burgers
Contact   Louise Hogan logmur@bigpond.com
     
     
Sunday 16 June   Year 9 Mother Daughter Pizza Night
5.00pm   Love Supreme, 180 Oxford St Paddington
Cost   $35 per head
RSVP    6 June 2019
Online Booking   Year 9 Mother Daughter Pizza Night
Contact   Sancia de Jersey
     
     
 Go to the Parent Portal for contact information 


 

 

 

Firstly, I wanted to share two great resources – not individual articles or podcasts, but whole websites with a mine of information to help you through a range of topics!

1. You might have noticed some advertising in a variety of media outlets from the Office of the eSafety Commissioner about keeping kids safe online. There are a variety of resources for parents and carers which you might find helpful:
https://www.esafety.gov.au/

2. The Parents Website, published by Independent Schools Victoria, has a range of articles and other resources for parents of children of all ages. There will be something for you there for sure!

Secondly, we are interested in knowing what you might want from this section of our Newsletter. What ideas would you like us to talk more about (or less about!). Are there topics you are interested in, or resources to help you more than we could locate and share? Please let us know! Send me an email at jennyallum@sceggs.nsw.edu.au

Have a good week, everyone!

Jenny Allum
Head of School

 

 

Festival on Forbes Logo

Did you know our primary aim for this year’s Green Festival on Forbes on Sunday 25 August is to reduce rubbish going to landfill by 50%? There are so many ways the whole SCEGGS community can help us achieve this goal.

BYO Water Bottle and Keep Cup
Our wonderful Green Team have organised two Sydney Water refill stations for the Festival on Forbes plus all the school’s regular water bubblers to allow everyone at the fair to refill their water bottles for free!

Please remember to bring your own Keep Cup or reusable cup along for your coffees and hot drinks. There will be a free mug swap too, just pick up a clean mug from one of the baskets beside a coffee cart and hand it to the barista.

And don’t worry if you forget, there will be reusable water bottles and keep cups for sale. Single use cups will also be available, along with separate waste bins for the cups and the plastic lids.

Make sure to pop into our Enviro Stall where lots of interesting things will be happening all day, with great things to buy to help save our planet.

NOT SO FUN FACT: Australians consume more than 50,000 cups of take away coffee every half hour. An estimated 1 billion takeaway cups end up in landfill every year in Australia, taking more than 50 years to break down. Can you believe the plastic lids take 500 years to breakdown?

A big thank you to our wonderful Green Team – Ulrika Aroney, Juliet Schmidt and Sarah Stewart-Jones for all their hard work to date, you are doing an awesome job!


Year 7 Vintage Clothing Stall
Are there wearable items in your wardrobe that no longer "spark joy"? You can donate these to the Year 7 Vintage Clothing Stall. Click here to find out more.

The Festival on Forbes Committee

 

 

Primary Sport

Artistic Gymnastics
Several of our Level 3 and 4 Artistic levels girls attended an Inner-City Region clinic at Homebush on Sunday June 2nd. They were guided by expert coaches at six different stations where they refined current skills and were exposed to new techniques to work on. Thank you to Glen Hay, Taylor Jones and Mariennne Butler for accompanying the girls.

BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Artistic Gym 2.6.19 2 BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Artistic Gym 2.6.19. 1 2
 BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Artistic Gym 2.6.19. 2 2  

Rhythmic Gymnastics

Our Rhythmic gymnasts competed in the SCEGGS in house competition on Saturday 1st June. Congratulations to Bianca Hardge, Georgia Farrow, Hannah James, Ilana Patkar, Madison Liew, Cassandra Davies, Sally Webster and Laura Davies for their performance. All girls competed with confidence in their new Rhythmic Gymnastics routines in freehand, rope, hoop, ball, clubs and ribbon.

BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Iiana Patkar Rhythmic 2 BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Cassie Davies Rhythmic 2


CIS Cross Country
Nancy Newton and Anjola Petrie have been training hard and will be competing in the IPSHA team at the CIS Cross Country on Thursday 13th June at Eastern Creek. We wish them both the best of luck in their event.


Cross Country Relay
Congratulations to Nancy Newton who competed in the State Cross Country 4 X 2k relay on Saturday 25th May. Her team came second in the event.

BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Nancy Newton Cross Country relay 1 2 BTGG 2019 06 06 Primary Sport Nancy Newton. Cross Country relay 2


Athletics Carnival
The Primary Carnival will be held on Wednesday 12th June at E.S. Marks Athletics Field, Cnr Boronia St & Anzac Parade, Kensington. The carnival will commence at approximately 9.15am and end at 2.00pm.

All girls will be in a 100m sprint race, their class relay and can enter all field events and the 800m. Girls receive a point for their House when they compete in an event.

We have been informed by IPSHA that NSWPSSA has added 1500m as an event. IPSHA will also have the 1500m event as the last event of the day at their carnival. The 1500m will also be run at CIS this year.

In light of this we will run a Primary 1500m event at Athletics training on Monday 17th June at ES Marks Athletics field for any girls interested. The girls will catch the school bus at 3.15pm, and can remain at training until the finish at 4.50pm. Pick up is at ES Marks at 4.50pm or at the Sports Hall at approximately 5.20pm.

If you would like your daughter to participate, please let me know via email suephillips@sceggs.nsw.edu.au. Please see below the qualifying times for IPSHA:
1500m GIRLS 8-10yrs 5m59s
1500m GIRLS 11yrs 5m40s
1500m GIRLS 12/13yrs 5m33s

All Primary Co-curricular sport on Wednesday 12th June will go ahead after school.

 

Sue Phillips
Primary Sport Co-ordinator

 

 

St Peter’s Players – Semester 2 New Directions
St Peter’s Players will take on new structure and content in Semester 2. Exciting new classes include Dance and Acting for Camera. For the first time, we also welcome Year 5 to the St Peter’s Players experience. Participation will require re-enrolment and an indication of class selection(s). Correspondence communicating the revised format of our Co-curricular program is available in the attached document. You will find the dates of all classes and our Tutor profiles.

Students are requested to submit their enrolment form to Mr Eyers no later than Monday June 17th. Confirmation of classes will then be communicated in the last week of term.

Audition Notice – Saving SCEGGS
SCEGGS Darlinghurst will present Saving SCEGGS by Linden Wilkinson in Term IV. The play examines a critical chapter in the history of SCEGGS and will be a perfect way to enter the School's 125th celebrations in 2020.

Ms Eddi Goodfellow will be directing.

Auditions will be conducted at SCEGGS, St Peter’s Playhouse on Wednesday June 19th and Friday June 21st from 4pm to 6pm. Please note that the audition will take the form of a workshop and all applicants will audition together. You need not prepare anything but cold reads will be given on the day.

Callback auditions will be conducted on Tuesday June 25th. Applicants will be contacted by email on Friday June 21st if they have received a callback audition and will be required to prepare an allocated speech.

The production will feature a cast of students from Years 7 to 11 and you are invited to express your interest in auditioning. Please email your intention to audition to petereyers@sceggs.nsw.edu.au and include a headshot (this is only for identification purposes and may be taken with mobile phone or your school photo), some detail about your performance experience and your preferred audition day.

Production dates: Thursday November 21st to Saturday November 23rd at 7pm. Saturday November 23rd at 3pm
Venue: The Great Hall – SCEGGS Darlinghurst

BTGG 2019 06 06 Drama Saving SCEGGS

Drama Tour – New York & Chicago
The Drama Department will be running a tour to the U.S.A. in April 2020. The tour will travel to Chicago and New York taking in visits to extraordinary theatre and participation in workshops, along with awesome sight-seeing and mandatory shopping. The tour is for girls in Years 10, 11 or 12 in 2020. It is open initially to girls currently studying Drama. If places are available, we will offer it to other girls who can demonstrate a strong interest in Drama.

Deposits and Booking Forms are due by Tuesday June 11th to secure your place.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
An excursion to the musical Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has been planned for students in Years 7-11 St Peter’s Players and Academic Drama. This trip to the theatre will take place on Sunday June 23rd at 6pm. Keen students are advised to return permission slips in a timely fashion to secure participation.

There are six seats remaining. Please be quick to ensure you secure a Golden Ticket!

A Chorus Line – Bookings
Bookings are now open for our 2019 Musical – A Chorus Line. Final rehearsals are developing impressively as all departments merge to form the show. We look set to enjoy another superb production at SCEGGS. Tickets may be obtained from The Seymour Centre box office.
BTGG 2019 06 06 Drama A Chorus Line Poster

You have to love dancing to stick to it. It gives nothing back, no manuscripts to store away, no paintings to show on walls and maybe hang in museums, no poems to be printed and sold, nothing but that single, fleeting moment when you feel alive.
Merce Cunnigham (Dance Pioneer)

Peter Eyers
Head of Drama

 

 

Assembly Performance
Well done to Hiroi Migita (Year 12) who played the introduction and recession pieces for Ms Gyton on Monday. Hiroi played excerpts from Green Parrot Street by Peter Dasent. This work is part of Hiroi’s Music 2 Performance program. You will hear more from Hiroi and other Year 12 Music students who will be performing pieces from their HSC program in a concert next week.

Sensational Porridge!

BTGG 2019 06 06 Music

Congratulations to all Year 4 students who took part in the Year 4 Musical, Porridge! There were many memorable moments from the performance and the characters from nursery rhymes will never be seen in the same light after this production. Well done and congratulations to Mrs Bronwyn Cleworth for her preparation and direction of the performance. Thank you also to Ms Stephanie Holmes, Ms Jayne Groves and Mr Tim Paillas who were the musicians for the production.

Congratulations to Astrid Girdis (Year 10) who has completed her Grade 4 AMEB Singing examination. Astrid achieved an outstanding result for this examination and is to be congratulated for her hard work and preparation.

Vocal Soirée Performances
Well done to students of Ms Kylie Bailey who performed in lunchtime soirées held on Monday and Thursday of this week. Many of the students are quite new to this art form and should be congratulated for their hard work and perseverance in preparing for this performance. Thank you to Ms Bailey for her preparation of the students and to Ms Heidi Jones and Ms Stephanie Holmes for their accompaniment.

Upcoming Performances:
Year 11 Concert
The concert will feature performances by students studying Preliminary Music 1 and 2 courses. The performance will take place in the Great Hall Thursday 6 June, starting at 5:30pm.

Year 12 Concert
The concert will feature performances by students studying HSC Music 1, 2 and Extension courses. The performance will feature part of each student’s Performance program. The concert will be held in the Great Hall next Wednesday 12 June, commencing at 5:30pm.

Primary Piano Concert
This will take place in the Great Hall on Friday 21 June from 3.30pm - 4.30pm.

String Concerts
Join us on Monday 24 June, Tuesday 25 June or Wednesday 26 June (or all three days!) from 3.30pm - 4.15pm for the String Concert in the Primary Music Room.

Madrigals Excursion Reminder
A reminder that members of the Madrigal Ensemble will be attending Last Night of the Proms with Ms Allison Harrigan on Thursday 6 June at Sydney Opera House. The performance begins at 6:30pm, but students are required to meet Ms Harrigan at 6:00pm near the Box Office to collect their tickets.

Labelling of Instruments and Cases
All students who store their instruments in the Diana Bowman Centre must label their instruments/cases clearly. There have been some instances where students’ instruments have been mistaken for school instruments and were moved. Please check with members of the Music staff if you wish to borrow an instrument for short term use. Students are also encouraged to take their instruments home at the end of the day as there are limited spaces in the storeroom.

Pauline Chow
Head of Music

 

 

BTGG 2019 06 06 world environment day 002

In 1974 the United Nations proclaimed June 5 as World Environment Day. The aim of the day is to encourage worldwide awareness and action to protect our environment. The theme for 2019 is air pollution.

In the Secondary School, the focus of Monday’s assembly was on how the individual can make a difference. Mark Piwkowski, CEO of Quayclean, was our special guest explaining the state of recycling in Australia and how our waste is recycled. His take home message was, as consumers, we need to think carefully about what we purchase so as not to create the waste in the first place. A group of Maailma girls created a video on how the small changes they make can make a difference to the waste in the school.

In Form meetings this week, Maailma girls will be going to Year meetings to run a Kahoot quiz on how waste is recycled through the various bins at school.

During lunchtime, the girls are experimenting with the GIS Locater app to photograph and map rubbish left around the school. This will help us determine if we have bins located in the correct areas and the right mix of bins to minimise the rubbish left around the school. Some of the Staff and students will be positioned at the bins to help educate the community on what goes into what bin.

The Year 7 Form groups are having a competition to see who can come up with the best message for the environment and decoration of the paper bins in their classrooms.

For more information about World Environment day click here.

What can you do to make a change for the environment?

Maailma Environment Club

 

 

There have been cases of head lice reported in the Secondary School. Head lice are very common in schools, and it is important that all parents check their daughter’s hair regularly and follow the necessary procedures if needed. For further information, please refer to the NSW Health Department. 

 

 

As we have some extra copies, if families would like a further copy of Lux from either last year or 2017, they are welcome to purchase one or more copies from Student Services. This offer remains open until the end of Term II, after which extra copies will be recycled.

 

 

Congratulations to the Year 7A, 7B, 8A, 8B, 9, and Senior Archdale teams for winning their third round of Archdale debates this Tuesday. Congratulations also to the Primary B and Year 7 ISDA teams who won their Quarter Final debates last Friday – they will compete in the Semi Final on 14 June.

Archdale debates next week will be held at Tangara; the bus will leave SCEGGS immediately after school, and will leave Tangara to return to SCEGGS at 8pm. The topic area is Law and Justice.

Primary IPSHA debates will be held at SCEGGS this Friday, on the topic “That parents should never feed their children junk food.”

Imogen Harper
Debating Co-ordinator

 

 


P & F Events
   
     
Thursday 13 June
  Year 3 Class Parent Cocktail Party
 7.00pm    Private Home
 Cost    $60 (covers food and drink)
 Online Booking   Details to come
     
     
Sunday 16 June   Year 7 Class Parent
Barefoot Bowling & Burgers
1.00pm-5.00pm   The Greens Bowling Club, North Sydney
RSVP   14 June
Online Booking   Year 7 Barefoot Bowling & Burgers
Contact   Louise Hogan logmur@bigpond.com
     
     
Sunday 16 June   Year 9 Mother Daughter Pizza Night
5.00pm   Love Supreme, 180 Oxford St Paddington
Cost   $35 per head
RSVP    6 June 2019
Online Booking   Year 9 Mother Daughter Pizza Night
Contact   Sancia de Jersey
     
     
 Go to the Parent Portal for contact information 


 

 

 

School Photograph Day

School photographs will be taken over two days: Secondary School individual and Year Group photographs will take place on Thursday 6 June and Primary School Individual and Year Group photographs and all sibling photographs will take place on Friday 7June.

Semester 1 Co-curricular photographs will take place over both days.

Orders for photograph packages can be placed securely online at www.advancedlife.com.au using our school’s unique 9 digit Online Order Code. Sibling photographs must be pre-ordered online up until midnight the day before photography.

The Online Order Code is located on the ordering envelope or on the Details page of the SCEGGS Parent Portal.

All girls in Years K-12 will have received an ordering envelope. Online portrait and group package orders are due by June 5.

 

NSW Health offers all school students free vaccinations recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. These vaccines are important and protect students through to adulthood.

All Year 10 Students will be offered the meningococcal ACWY vaccine on Thursday 12 June. An information pack has been sent home to year 10 parents which includes a consent form and a record of vaccination for parents to keep after their child has been vaccinated. If a student is absent for any of the clinics, they will have the opportunity to catch up at the next school visit.

Please sign the consent form and have your daughter return it to Student Services by Wednesday 5 June, UNLESS you do not wish your daughter to be vaccinated. Please note: the nurses will be unable to vaccinate any student if their form is not signed by their parent or guardian.

 

 

 

Secondary Sport

NSW All Schools Water Polo
Congratulations to Sienna Green and Lana Oppenheim who represented NSWCIS last week at the NSW All Schools Water Polo Championships. NSWCIS won the competition which included teams from NSW Combined High Schools, NSW Combined Catholic College and Queensland. A special congratulations to Sienna who was selected in the NSW All Schools Team at the completion of the tournament.

Current Coach and Old Girl Attacking her Goals
The School community is proud to acknowledge the achievements of Amy Parmenter. Amy is an Old Girl (Class of 2015 and 2015 Head Girl) and a current SCEGGS Netball and Cross-country coach. As a member of Giants Super Netball, Sydney’s premier Australian league team in the Suncorp Super Netball competition, Amy was voted MVP in her most recent match. Amy balances her sporting and coaching commitments while studying a double university degree in Law and Public Communications. Amy has caught the attention of the sporting world and we encourage you to read this SMH article (if you haven’t already!) which also details Amy’s strength of character off the court as well.

Hockey Trials
We will be commencing trials for all girls who wish to play hockey in Term III. Buses will transport all students to and from the venues for all trials. Shin pads, hockey sticks and mouthguard are compulsory.

SNR Trials (Years 10, 11 and 12) Monday 3 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex
SNR 1st CALL BACKS:  Wednesday 12 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex
  Monday 17 June
6.45am-8.00am
SCEGGS Top Court
  Tuesday 25 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex
JNR Trials (Yr 8 & 9) Monday 17 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex
JNR 1st CALL BACKS Wednesday 26 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex
YEAR 7 Trials Wednesday 26 June
3.10pm – 5.00pm
David Phillips Complex

Please ensure you have a hockey stick, shin pads and a mouth guard for each session as these are compulsory. If you need to borrow a hockey stick, please see either Ms Gowan or Ms Smith in the PE staff room. Any problems or concerns, please see Miss Smith as soon as possible.

Buses to Frensham for Saturday Sport
SCEGGS will be sending two buses to Frensham for our upcoming Saturday fixtures on June 22. Please indicate numbers with Ms Axford in the PDHPE Dept if your daughter requires transport: xantheaxford@sceggs.nsw.edu.au

Alison Gowan
Director of Sport

 

 

Primary Sport

Athletics Carnival
The Primary Carnival will be held on Wednesday 12 June at E.S. Marks Athletics Field, Cnr Boronia St & Anzac Parade, Kensington. The Carnival will commence at approximately 9.15am and end at 2.00pm.

All girls will be in a 100m sprint race, their class relay and can enter all field events and the 800m. Girls receive a point for their house when they compete in an event.

We have been informed by IPSHA that NSWPSSA has added 1500m as an event. IPSHA will also have the 1500m event as the last event of the day at their carnival. The 1500m will also be run at CIS this year.

In light of this we will run a Primary 1500m event at Athletics training on Monday 17 June at ES Marks Athletics field for any girls interested. If you would like your daughter to participate, please let me know via email. suephillips@sceggs.nsw.edu.au Please see below the qualifying times for IPSHA:

1500m GIRLS 8-10yrs 5m59s

1500m GIRLS 11yrs 5m40s

1500m GIRLS 12/13yrs 5m33s

All Primary Co-Curricular sport on Wednesday 12 June will go ahead after school.

 

Touch Football
Several girls have been participating in Touch football skills on Wednesday afternoons. They are building on their fitness and ball handling skills, as well as strategies to use in game situations.

Years 4-6 Touch Football trials will be held in Week 9, Tuesday 25 June at Moore Park, Cnr Robertson and Lang Road. The girls will go by bus and can be picked up at 4.50pm at the field or approximately 5.20pm outside the Sports Hall in Forbes Street.

BTGG 2019 05 30 Primary Sport 1  

 

 

BTGG 2019 05 30 Primary Sport 2

  BTGG 2019 05 30 Primary Sport 5
BTGG 2019 05 30 Primary Sport 3     BTGG 2019 05 30 Primary Sport 4 
   
 
 
 

 

Sue Phillips
Primary Sport Co-ordinator


 

Audition Notice – Saving SCEGGS
SCEGGS Darlinghurst will present Saving SCEGGS by Linden Wilkinson in Term IV. The play examines a critical chapter in the history of SCEGGS and will be a perfect way to enter the School's 125th celebrations in 2020.

Ms Eddi Goodfellow will be directing.

Auditions will be conducted at SCEGGS, St Peter’s Playhouse on Wednesday June 19 and Friday June 21 from 4pm to 6pm. Please note that the audition will take the form of a workshop and all applicants will audition together. You need not prepare anything but cold reads will be given on the day.
Callback auditions will be conducted on Tuesday June 25th. Applicants will be contacted by email on Friday June 21st if they have received a callback audition and will be required to prepare an allocated speech.

The production will feature a cast of students from Years 7 to 11 and you are invited to express your interest in auditioning. Please email your intention to audition to petereyers@sceggs.nsw.edu.au and include a headshot (this is only for identification purposes and may be taken with mobile phone or your school photo), some detail about your performance experience and your preferred audition day.

Production dates: Thursday November 21 to Saturday November 23 at 7pm. Saturday November 23 at 3pm.
Venue: The Great Hall – SCEGGS Darlinghurst.

 

BTGG 2019 05 28 Drama 6

 

Drama Tour - New York & Chicago
The Drama Department will be running a tour to the U.S.A. in April 2020. The tour will travel to Chicago and New York taking in visits to extraordinary theatre and participation in workshops, along with awesome sight-seeing and mandatory shopping. The tour is for girls in Years 10, 11 or 12 in 2020. It is open initially to girls currently studying Drama. If places are available, we will offer it to other girls who can demonstrate a strong interest in Drama.

Deposits are now due to secure your place.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
An excursion to the musical Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has been planned for students in Years 7-10 St Peter’s Players and Academic Drama. This trip to the theatre will take place on Sunday June 23 at 6.00pm. Keen students are advised to return permission slips in a timely fashion to secure participation.


A Chorus Line – Bookings
Bookings are now open for our 2019 Musical – A Chorus Line. Tickets may be obtained from The Seymour Centre box office. 


BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 7

 

Here’s another glimpse, inside our rehearsal room:

  

BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 2 BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 5 BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 3
BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 4  BTGG 2019 05 30 Drama 1
     

 

Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion.
― Martha Graham – Teacher / Choreographer

Peter Eyers
Head of Drama

 

 

 

 

School Photograph Day

School photographs will be taken over two days: Secondary School individual and Year Group photographs will take place on Thursday 6 June and Primary School Individual and Year Group photographs and all sibling photographs will take place on Friday 7June.

Semester 1 Co-curricular photographs will take place over both days.

Orders for photograph packages can be placed securely online at www.advancedlife.com.au using our school’s unique 9 digit Online Order Code. Sibling photographs must be pre-ordered online up until midnight the day before photography.

The Online Order Code is located on the ordering envelope or on the Details page of the SCEGGS Parent Portal.

All girls in Years K-12 will have received an ordering envelope. Online portrait and group package orders are due by June 5.

 

 

 

Week 6 is Library and Information Week and this year’s theme is “Truth, Integrity and Knowledge”.

Come and help us celebrate! All events and competitions will run at lunchtime in the Secondary Library.

Participate in these events and competitions and win a prize or two:

Monday - Try your hand at Spine Poetry
Tuesday – Make a bookmark to add to your collection
Friday – Play True or False (it’s a new competition!)

Ms Hughes
Library Assistant

 

 

Congratulations to the Mock Trial team who won their Round 3 trial against Sydney Boys’ High School last week. Their task was to defend a major shopping centre in a civil case involving negligence. It was a fascinating and demanding trial, but the team won convincingly. Katarina Kuo and Amelia Board (barristers) gave outstanding opening and closing addresses and demonstrated quick thinking in cross examination. Kristina Comino (solicitor) provided excellent support on the basis of her detailed preparation. Phoebe Masnick and Aisha Imtarnasan (witnesses) were steadfast in the face of aggressive cross examination. It was a wonderful team effort and a satisfying reward for all the hard work. Congratulations girls! We look forward to Round 4 against St Vincent’s College.

Kelly McManus
Mock Trial Co-ordinator

 

 

At SCEGGS we recognise the benefits of exchange and immersion experiences not just for students but for teachers too! One such experience was undertaken by Drama teacher Vivienne Rodda to the Nightingale Bamford School in New York. In this issue of Behind the Green Gate, Ms Rodda writes about the community behind the "Blue Door". 

I had the tremendous good fortune late last year of being selected to visit The Nightingale Bamford School in New York. This was a wonderful opportunity to engage with the teaching and learning in a like environment, in an international city, and be a fly on the wall to the similarities and differences in pedagogy and our 21st Century learners.

The Nightingale Bamford School is located on the Upper East side on the corner of Madison Ave and East 92nd street, adjacent to Central Park, and right around the corner from The Guggenheim. While being slightly smaller, enrolling approximately 650 students between its Lower School and the Upper Schools, it is remarkably similar to SCEGGS; just as we have the Green Gate, through which our girls enter, the Nightingale students all come through their "Blue Doors", an entry way on 92nd Street. The Blue Doors is also coincidentally the name of the regular publication Nightingale produces just as we have our own Behind the Green Gate!

BTGG 2019 05 23 Teacher Exchange View from the LibraryThe building in which the school operates is, like SCEGGS, a combination of the old and the new, with a beautiful, expansive, Edith Wharton-like window that provides picturesque views from their library. It is very old New York, and part of the original 1920 school building. In more recent years, several modern buildings and additions have been integrated with the original block, and the school now occupies approximately seven floors of its building, with each year group or stage occupying a floor.

In my two weeks at the school, I was fortunate to have a wide variety of experiences, attending an excursion to a glass blowing factory in Brooklyn with Year 8, serving lunch in a soup kitchen on a visit with the lower school, attending a PE class in Central Park, and seeing the school production of Noises Off among many other things, all of which were routine when you are as well located as Nightingale.

It was fascinating to learn of the differences in subject and course selection and how a school creates a program of study in an Independent New York School. The school follows no approved or endorsed program or curriculum and are permitted to create their own. This provides a great deal of freedom in the devising of courses and the programs set for study. Some subjects such as English are mandatory until Senior Year. Staff and Heads of Department (Chairs) write course proposals, which are submitted and approved, before they are offered to students. An elective English course in a Senior Year of study may include an intensive analysis of a poet or playwright or be more thematic covering a topic such as New York City Literature or Shakespeare’s Tragedies.

Nightingale was very proud of its strong focus on student-centred learning, and its belief that the school’s role was to prepare students for a largely unknown future. Everyday Nightingale timetables a half-hour for the entire school community, called "Enrichment time", simply designed to allow the students the freedom and independence to pursue whatever they best felt fit. This was used variably, covering everything from meeting with teachers, completing homework or study, playing in the playground, or spending time in one of the student lounges with friends.

Many of my observations and experiences at Nightingale came from informal discussions with staff during lunch, as well as sitting in formal meetings and discussions where people were very generous and willing to share their thoughts about their school community. A topic among some long-standing staff was their disgruntlement at the direction in which the school was heading, particularly around things such as the allocated half an hour for enrichment, which they felt lacked efficacy. Accompanying this pursuit of student freedom also was the reduction of formal assessment tasks and formal reporting. Staff were both thrilled and baffled to learn that we held formal assessment blocks, where students were assessed, graded and reported upon formally twice a year.

Additional to the organisation of their secondary school, I further developed an understanding of tertiary entrance requirements, which were, again, vastly different to our own. As we have seen in the recent College Admissions Scandal, university entrance in the U.S.A. can be skewed towards those from more advantageous backgrounds, and as such, the system lacks the equality available in our own university entrance schemes. Without a prescribed syllabus to follow, courses taught at a high school level have a depth and breadth available to them in terms of choice, but also seem to have the pressure of making decisions as to what and how to prioritise the courses that students must include for the various requirements needed for entrance to their preferred university.

Accordingly, to prepare for college there is no standardised test like our HSC that significantly determines admission. American students do sit for their HSC equivalent, the SATs, but primarily there is a deeper, more complex process of essays, references, community involvement and submission of academic reports and GPA scores that are submitted for consideration. I was privy to numerous discussions amongst staff about the system of college entrance and the drive of students to appear to have achieved a well-rounded educational experience through numerous participation in extra-curricular activities, clubs, volunteering for a school newspaper, or being involved in community outreach programs, and the careful preparation and writing of the all-important college essays which were being taught in the junior year class I sat in on for a few days.


When I wasn’t at Nightingale I was absorbing all that New York has to offer and of course spending plenty of time on Broadway. The opportunity to see (and meet!) Bryan Cranston in Network, Daniel Radcliffe in The Lifespan of a Fact, Jeff Daniels in To Kill A Mockingbird and the exceptionally fabulous production of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was all wonderfully inspiring and enriching.

My learning and observations can only be touched upon in this article, but it was a tremendous opportunity and I look forward to supporting further collaborations between SCEGGS and the Nightingale Bamford School ahead. Their Head of School Paul Burke and Director of Global Operations Damaris Maclean were wonderful hosts and supported an experience that was enriching and impossible to forget.

Vivienne Rodda
Drama Teacher

 

 

 
The Power of Play


Is child play and “free-time” frivolous and something no longer needed or valued in our world? In our fast-paced lives, do our children even have time to play?

I recently attended a forum led by Pasi Sahlberg, Professor of Educational Policy and Deputy Director at the Gonski Institute for Education School of Education. The discussion centred on the differences between the philosophy and culture behind educational practices in Finland and here in Australia. Professor Sahlberg highlighted a few key differences but one struck a chord with me; the power of play. Educational policy in Finland stipulates that children have the right to 15 minutes of play in each hour of learning, additional to Recess and Lunchtime. Play in Finland is generally outdoor play, despite freezing temperatures, and is always child led. It seems to me that children often aspire or are encouraged to grow up quickly and to therefore dismiss play as something superfluous and not conducive to real learning. Professor Sahlberg’s concept of children having a “right” to play inspired and challenged me to reconsider the function of play for children.

As someone who grew up in the 1970s, unstructured play both indoors and outdoors was very much part of my everyday life. As an educator and a parent, I have often queried how much time this current generation of children dedicate to simply playing, and whether the decreased focus on play is something that negatively impacts their development and wellbeing. Play was something I took for granted as a child and yet I wonder if children today have the same experience or feel the same sense of entitlement. According to research by the American Psychological Association, children today spend more time on competitive sports, additional academic pursuits and screen-based entertainment than any previous generation. Whilst these are meritorious experiences for children, I also wonder if we are risking the elimination of a child’s natural predisposition to exercise their curiosity and creativity by limiting their chances of unstructured play? Having listened to Professor Sahlberg and having read the latest research from around the world, I think the answer is a resounding yes!

Current research shows that play is a powerful tool in the social, emotional and even educational development of a child. It therefore concerns me to read statistics arising from a study of 1,000 students conducted by University College London’s Institute of Education which show that just 1% of Secondary School students now have down-time in the afternoon compared to 41% of students 30 years ago. A child growing up in Finland experiences a shorter school day than their Australian counterparts and the Finnish Primary School child has a guaranteed 15 minutes of play in each hour. By the time a child within the Australian education system is 15 years old they have had the equivalent of 5 extra years of face to face teaching than their peers in Finland. As a teacher, I know how much thought, time and effort teachers invest in planning and delivering learning opportunities for students. Yet despite the additional years of teacher instruction, Finland has, according to data from the OECD’s international PISA tests, outperformed Australia in terms of results in literacy, Maths, Science and problem-solving as well as subjective measures like student happiness and positive wellbeing for the past two decades. The emphasis on wellbeing through play in Finland is deeply embedded in their education system and has been for several decades. Whilst it is no simple thing to change government policy, the correlation between a focus on play and improved results academically and emotionally is something I believe is worthy of discussion in our schools and homes.

There are many different types of play; imaginative, physical, sociodramatic, symbolic to name just a few. What these all have in common is that they have a positive impact on a child’s cognitive, physical, social and emotional development. Children develop and practise social skills as they learn to respect one another through the rules they make and break through their collaborative games. I find it hard to keep up with the ever-changing versions of traditional chasing games in the playground, but the girls are quick to adapt to these rule changes and the joy each girl feels as she charges around the playground connecting with others is palpable. Play enables children to build social connections and it also fosters confidence and resilience as the girls learn to negotiate the rules and inevitable challenges to those rules!

At the end of Term I, I worked with a group of Year 6 leaders to review our Primary School House Families and to seek their ideas for activities in Term II. The girls enthusiastically shared their ideas and I admit I was surprised by the number of girls who requested the inclusion of traditional games such as Cat’s Cradle and Elastics. They also wanted time to “invent” games and dramas within their Family groups. The fact that they felt the need to ask permission to devise their own games made me stop and think. Are we guilty of trying so hard to engage our children in learning activities that we are in danger of overlooking the power of spontaneous, unstructured play? The games the girls requested had a distinct lack of “rules” and so, by their very nature, offered endless opportunities for imaginative thinking. This is the power of play. Unstructured play allows children the chance to explore, invent and think creatively and critically; all skills which are critical for the world they will enter once they complete their education.

Research suggests that play promotes self-initiated learning and offers a child agency over their learning. I only need to spend a few moments on the playground to see how true that is. At any given playtime there are girls involved in active collaborative play whilst others are building worlds with wooden blocks, some are quietly tracking native stingless bees in the flowers and others are testing their superpowers in fantastical worlds. This led me to reflect on the wise words of Sir David Attenborough who is, amongst other things, the Learning through Landscapes Patron. Sir David suggests that “outdoor environments can offer a very special kind of learning experience: the opportunity for discovery and learning through touching and feeling, the chance to explore and take risks, the stimulations of the fresh air and limitless skies. And yet, we are steadily depriving our children of these wonders.”

It seems to me that play enables children the chance to step outside the world we structure for them. Play offers children the chance to think boldly, to see and explore limitless worlds at their own pace. The power of play is simple; it helps children to show us and themselves what they are capable of. As we all aim to empower our girls and equip them with skills to take out into their world, perhaps play is something we should focus on as a superpower in their learning toolkit. Play can be a way of liberating thoughts, of embracing change, building resilience and forging social connections, all of which encourage a positive sense of self. Therefore, it seems to me that play and learning are inextricably linked and in the busyness of our world more important for children than ever before. Perhaps through their play, children can teach us all lessons on how to see the world and ourselves.

Kate Brown
Head of Student Wellbeing K-6

 

 

Order your School photographs online or by ordering envelopes

School photographs will be taken over two days: Secondary School individual and Year Group photographs will take place on Thursday 6 June and Primary School Individual and Year Group photographs and all sibling photographs will take place on Friday 7 June. Semester 1 Co-curricular photographs will take place over both days.

Orders for photograph packages can be placed securely online at www.advancedlife.com.au using our school’s unique 9 digit Online Order Code, or by returning the Advanced Life ordering envelope. The Online Order Code is located on the ordering envelope or on the Details page of the SCEGGS Parent Portal.

All girls in Years K-12 will receive an ordering envelope next week (Week 4). These envelopes can be used if you wish to pay by cheque or cash. If you are using this method, please return your envelope to the School by Friday 31 May.

Online portrait and group package orders are due by June 5.

Sibling Photographs will also be taken on Friday 7 June. These photographs may also be booked online or via a Sibling Order Envelope which can be collected from Student Services in the Secondary School or from the Primary Office.

 

 

I recently read an interesting article published by the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley titled “How to live a more courageous life”. The article outlined a number of areas which were key to this, and creating community was paramount. Research shows that feeling connected to a community is one of the most important protective factors against mental illness and important in building resilience. It is also a key factor in improving academic performance too! This is one of the reasons why schools encourage students to participate in everything from camp to extra-curricular activities. House events, such as the Swimming Carnival or House Drama are also such fabulous opportunities for a sense of belonging to be formed and solidified. So, when I sat down to think about what I would contribute to "In this together", I kept coming back to the Prefects’ theme for 2019, "connection".

I remember sitting with the new group of Prefects last year and listening to what they wanted for the students of SCEGGS. They expressed a desire to see stronger relationships within and across year groups, to hear the buzz of chatter across the playground at lunch times rather than girls looking at their phones, and increased participation in House and Co-curricular activities; in other words they wanted everyone to feel like they were part of a community. It was so heartening to hear these young women express how much they wanted to encourage these connections, and how important SCEGGS was in their lives.

It got me considering the importance of having strong connections between families and the School. I believe that a strength of SCEGGS is the sense of community that exists, not just in the student body, but the community as a whole - students, staff, parents, and Alumni. I have seen moments where families are in real crisis and have marvelled at the way that staff and students at SCEGGS offer support with such care and openness. In the coming weeks we have a musical soiree where a number of Old Girls will be performing, and at the end of last term SPAN hosted another fabulous event that was attended by parents and students, past and present. How wonderful to be part of a community that is enriched by the strong, supportive connections that have been fostered.

Therefore, it saddens me to see stories in the media about "bully parents" or "concierge parenting", because it suggests that the relationship between home and school is one that, in today’s society, may not be valued as highly as it was. What a shame it would be to see this relationship disintegrate or become one of tension, when both school and home want the young people for whom they care to be flourishing emotionally, succeeding academically, and feeling supported socially. This is not to say that each and every day will be a positive one, or that there will not be moments where your daughter feels disappointed by a grade or let down by a friend. However, how we work together to assist your daughter to navigate these moments greatly impacts on their ability to develop the necessary skills to become a resilient young woman.

I particularly liked the idea raised in the Greater Good article that, “As humans, we make meaning out of our experiences by telling stories to ourselves about how the world operates. But here’s the important part: Those stories might not be objectively true. They are more like your personal lens on life, colouring your experiences just as if you were wearing sunglasses.” Not only is this a good reminder for us as adults, but it is also important to teach to young people. There is no doubt that it is difficult to face a school day when your friendships are changing, or you have received a disappointing mark, but it also isn’t the end of the world. Instead, we want to help young people learn the skills to reframe negative narratives that they might tell themselves when they feel overwhelmed, lonely or anxious. Another important factor to consider is the correlation between strong social support, optimistic thinking and a significant reduction in stress. This in turn reduces stress in the home too - something I am sure that many parents would heartily welcome as your daughter faces the different challenges that growing up brings.

This is where having a strong connection between the School and families can be so helpful, as if the message young people are hearing is consistent and empowering, what a difference this can make. Fear, feeling rejected or like a failure are natural and normal feelings, and a very important part of learning, but they do not have to control the way that young people respond to the events in their lives. Instead, as the title of this section of Behind the Green Gate suggests, we are in this together, and together can continue to engender a culture of courageous thoughts and actions here at SCEGGS.

Reference
Swoboda, K., “How to live a more courageous life”, Greater Good Magazine: Science Based Insights for a Meaningful Life, UC Berkley, October 10, 2018.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

Some holiday reading and listening for you all over the school holidays...

Dear Everyone

I thought you might like to see a few different articles we have come across over the past few months.
Perhaps one or two of them might be interesting for you over the school holidays?

1. On perfectionism.
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/11/how-perfectionism-can-be-destructive/574837/?utm_campaign=the-atlantic&utm_term=2018-11-05T13%3A49%3A31&utm_content=edit-promo&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter 

2. A fun, but serious article from The New York Times that we can ALL learn from!
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/31/opinion/smartphones-screen-time.html 

3. Some good practical tips to parents for managing screen time.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/family/parenting/screens-teens-survival-tips-parents-technology-battlefield/ 

4. Interested in the digital detox trend in restaurants?
https://www.broadsheet.com.au/sydney/city-file/article/mobile-phones-are-menu-cbd-restaurant 

5. Helping teenage girls reframe anxiety and strengthen resilience.
https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/52994/how-to-help-teenage-girls-reframe-anxiety-and-strengthen-resilience 

6. And lastly, a podcast from The Harvard EdCast – “Overparented, Underprepared”.
https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/the-harvard-edcast/id1062333296?mt=2&i=1000431228164 

Wishing all our parents a lovely school holiday time from all of us at SCEGGS, when we get there!

Jenny Allum
Head of School

 

 

Congratulations to all the students who participated in this year's Inter-House Speaking Challenge. I am pleased to share the following results:

1st Christian
2nd Docker
3rd  Barton
4th Badham
5th Langley
6th Beck

 

Individual Results

1st Madeleine Kowalenko Christian
2nd  Phoebe Masnick Docker
3rd Equal: Sylvie Stannage
Harriet Harper 
Georgina Harley-Macdonald
Barton
Badham 
Langley

Sandra Carter
Co-ordinator of Public Speaking

 
 

It was with immense sadness that I saw the news last week about the tragedy in Christchurch.

The loss experienced in such an horrific event is so profound and something which has far-reaching impact. It is impossible to understand why such events occur, and your daughters may have many questions, but sometimes events such as these can trigger other worries. This can include concerns for a family member or friend who may be unwell, or remembering somebody they know who has passed away. I think, too, of the individuals and families in our community who may be coming to terms with their own loss. Grief and loss, in whatever form, can be a distressing experience.

Grief is a natural response to loss. It might be the loss of a loved one, relationship or even a pet, or it may be that grief is experienced through empathising with the loss of others such as the recent events in Christchurch. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief is likely to be.

Children and adults grieve differently due to their developmental stage, and sometimes this can prove difficult for parents to understand and navigate. Young children fluctuate in and out of the stages of grief rapidly, as they may not comprehend the permanency death; they express their grief more physically. Teens on the other hand may not know how to express their grief and will need some space and time to process their loss. Some may choose to grieve alone, not wanting to stand out or be seen as not coping, whilst others may be much more comfortable expressing their feelings and worries.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents can learn how to acknowledge their child’s feelings and the best way to support them through experiences of grief. Click here for this month's edition.

In This Together
We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition and we always welcome your feedback. If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the School.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care



What is your favourite tip or guideline to help your daughter have a good night’s sleep?
Thank you to all the parents who submitted a sleep tip last week – we had a fantastic response and have many great words of wisdom from lots of different families across the school. So a big thank you to you all!

The tips covered all sorts of different strategies and included ideas about the importance of exercise and natural light during the day, having consistent routines, managing technology well, using different relaxation strategies, thinking about the quality of the sleep as well as quantity, making sure games and activities get quieter as the evening goes on ... and much, much more!

As I heard a teacher say to a group of students last year, “Do you want to do better at school, be a better learner and feel better in yourself by doing absolutely nothing at all? Then go to sleep!” So how do we help kids do this? Here are your top tips for 5-18 year olds:


1. Consistent routines really help

  • Consistent routines help us make sleep a priority
  • Have a consistent routine prior to a consistent bed time – even on the weekends when you can!
  • Make sure the girls are organised and not procrastinating about homework, so that they can go to bed at a consistent time
  • We’ve made our mornings calmer for everyone by getting things organised the night before – and we try not to have any late nights as a family during the school week.

2. Winding down on device time

  • At least an hour of "screen free time" before bedtime on week nights. We are doing this too and it makes such a difference!
  • No phones at the dinner table – ever!
  • No devices at least an hour before bedtime – this really makes a difference to the quality of sleep we are all getting.

3. "Tech free" bedrooms – no matter what!

  • No technology in bedrooms after a set time (eg 8pm) – and don’t fall for the excuses like "I need my phone to listen to music or to use as an alarm clock" because they don’t! This works much better for us than any software that limits access to Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube or anything else.
  • No screens or phones in rooms overnight – no matter what!
  • Have one place in the living area to charge phones and request that phones are in the charging area from a certain time (eg 7pm or 9pm). This ensures phones are out of the bedroom for study and sleep times. If they need to use the phone they must come to the charging area (eg in the living room).
  • All devices (phones, school tablets etc - including the parents' devices) must be charged in a central spot downstairs overnight. We aim to have the phones there from dinner time onwards.

4. Food and drink – the right amount at the right time

  • Ensure dinner is quiet, calm and healthy – being too full or hungry makes it harder to get a good night’s sleep.
  • No caffeine for my older daughter after lunch – and I’m using this rule too to try and be a good role model!

 

5. Calm your brain by doing something relaxing before bed

  • 20-30 minutes of reading in bed each night before lights out.
  • A calm bath at the end of the day does wonders!
  • Read a familiar bedtime story, one they have read many times before, keep the conversation quiet and calm.

Thank you again to all the families who submitted a sleep tip last week! And if you missed the opportunity to participate this time, perhaps it is a question you could ask the parents of your daughter’s friends sometime ... what sleep time tips do they have that might work well for you too?

 

Holly Gyton
Deputy Head of School



Junior Inter-House Speaking Challenge

 House Results

Place                House                   
1st  Langley
2nd  Christian
3rd  Barton
4th  Beck
5th  Docker
6th   Badham

 

Individual Results

Place   Name                   
House
1st Ishara Verdickt Langley
2nd Olga Giannikouris Christian
3rd Catherine Park Langley
=4th Annie Furness Barton
=4th Amelia Moran Christian

Congratulations to all speakers. The standard was very high with the results in the first round extremely close.

Sandra Carter
Public Speaking Co-ordinator

 

 

A Good Night’s Sleep
“In partnership with the School, it is essential that our parents are empowered with the knowledge and skills to help them navigate their daughters’ educational and social growth.”
Our Path Ahead (SCEGGS Strategic Plan)

For our parents, that knowledge can come from many different places – articles, family members, SCEGGS staff, news, blogs, friends ... the list goes on! There is a lot of wisdom amongst the parents within the SCEGGS community too! And from time to time, we use "In This Together" to share tips and advice submitted by your fellow SCEGGS parents that might help you navigate each of your daughter’s growth in the years ahead.

We all know how important a good night's sleep is for adults and children alike! Sleep enhances our wellbeing overall and when we get enough sleep, we tend to:

  • stay healthier
  • be more creative, think of new ideas and solve problems more easily
  • be able to pay attention, concentrate and remember things more easily
  • be in a better mood
  • get along better with friends and family

... and many other things too!

At several Parent Information Evenings recently, we have heard parents sharing their tips with each other about how to help their daughter have a good night's sleep - limiting screen time before bed, keeping regular routines, exercise during the day and many more.

So what is your favourite parenting tip to help your daughter have a good night's sleep? We’d love you to hear from everyone who has a favourite tip or guideline to share using this quick survey link.

This short survey will close on Monday 25 February at midday ... and we will share a sample of your feedback in Behind the Green Gate next week.

 

Holly Gyton
Deputy Head of School


 

 

Touch

Place                House                   
Results
1st  Langley 25 points
2nd  Beck 15 points (countback)
3rd  Docker 15 points
4th  Barton 15 points
5th  Christian 11 points
6th   Badham 9 points

 

Softball

Place                House                   
Results
1st Barton 23 points
2nd Christian 21 points
3rd Langley 13 points (countback)
4th Badham 13 points
5th Docker 11 points
6th  Beck 9 points

 

 Touch 1

Touch 2

 Touch 3

      19 02 21 InterHouseSoftball

 

 

“There is a reason we were given two ears and one mouth..."

Whatever the age of your daughter, keeping the lines of communication open is so important. Whether you have a quiet and shy child, an outgoing pre-teen or a moody teenager who is monosyllabic at best, here are some ideas to help.

Firstly, three tips:

 
Tip #1:               
Be curious... about her life, her opinions, her ideas.
  Tip #2:    Don’t push it. If the time isn’t right and she doesn’t want to chat or tell you what’s worrying her, let it be...

  Tip #3: Let her know you are always there to listen. That you care about her, that you are easy going and accepting, that you won’t be judgemental...

Keep trying to find the right sort of questions which will encourage your daughter to talk. It might be music or sport, or something else she is particularly passionate about. And do persevere... but gently. She will see that you are open to talk, that you care, that you are interested, even if it doesn’t prompt a deep conversation at the time. You will get there!

Don’t ask closed questions – where the answer is can be given in one or two words. Don’t ask probing questions – it shouldn’t feel like an inquisition. Ask curious questions – about what she thinks, what she feels, what she is worried about. The aim is to get to know your daughter better – and to show you are interested in her, her life, and her views on the world.

You might try to schedule specific times you could start a conversation – over the dinner table, Sunday morning breakfast, or Friday night movies and pizzas. Regular, predictable and comfortable family routines encourage good conversations. But it doesn’t really matter how you start a conversation – what topic you choose. Be alive to what is happening around you, and what your daughter is interested in, thinking, or doing.

Now sometimes it is really tempting to tell her all about what you think! The moment she tells you about a problem or issue she is worried about, you know what she should do. (And of course, you are probably right – you are so much more experienced than her). Trying to resist the urge to solve her problems, to be bombastic or opinionated, but gently encouraging her to find the solution to problems herself, to work out for herself what she thinks ir right or important – it is a far better process in the long-run.

Learn to be quiet! I started by noting that we have two ears and one mouth. Listen more than you talk. Be comfortable with silence. It might take her time to process what she is feeling or wants to say. It might be taking her time to build courage to say something. Or she might be just thinking... Give her the time and space to think, and, just maybe, she might talk.

If you try to start a conversation, and she isn’t responsive, don’t push it. Just shrug and walk away, or drop the subject, or go back to something else you were doing. The time has to be right for her. Don’t push it – if she isn’t ready, let it go. End with something like “I am always ready to listen, when you are ready to talk something over...? Remember – I am always on your side... I always have your back.

The most important thing you can do is to tell her, with genuine love, softness and deep caring in your tone, that you love her. Every child needs to know that they are loved – even when their behaviour is not at all lovable. She needs to know that you love her, even when her behaviour is bad, even when she knows herself that she is being unreasonable and difficult. Smile at her and tell her you love her, write her a card or send a text, find lots of different ways to tell her you love her. Let her know that you are always there to talk or help if she needs it – that you will always be there for her, that you “have her back”.

Find every opportunity to notice good behaviour – and praise her explicitly for it so that she knows you know! Be as specific as possible. “I noticed the way you particularly got ready tonight for school tomorrow – with your bag packed up and ready to go. That is so good! I really admire your commitment to start the day well by being prepared the night before. I am so proud of you for doing that without being asked!”

If you ask a question to which the answer is either yes or no, you will probably just get that – and not a lot else. Practise asking questions like: “What do you think about...?” Or “Why do you think she did that...?” Or “How does that make you feel?” Or “What would you do differently next time?”

None of the advice above (or any other strategy you try) is going to make your communication with your daughter always constructive and friendly. But it might help, in some small ways. And remember – it will get easier, over time. I know this will be the case, without a doubt, even if it doesn’t feel like this is possible, right now. So hang in there!

 

Jenny Allum
Head of School


 

This month on SchoolTV - school transitions
Whether it is starting school for the first time, moving up to a higher grade or embarking on the journey to secondary school, there is no doubt that any school transition for children and parents can be a time of mixed emotions. However, as parents the way that you respond during this period can make a world of difference to how your daughter experiences the different challenges that she may face.

2019 02 07 Smartphones

This edition of SchoolTV provides a range of helpful resources, articles and tips to help you and your daughter to manage the transition. You will find information on topics such as starting high school, helping your daughter manage homework, and beginning at a new school. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered here and we always welcome your feedback. If you do have any concerns about your child, please contact the School.

To access the School Transitions edition of SchoolTV click here.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

Merry Christmas to all our community
A number of girls are leaving us at the end of the school year - you go with our best wishes and genuine desire for you to stay in touch with us. We care about you and your journey after SCEGGS deeply and will always want to hear how you are going.

Once a SCEGGS girl, always a SCEGGS girl!

Also a number of staff members are leaving at the end of the year – either to go to different teaching positions or on different types of Leave. We wish them all the best and thank them for the contributions they have made to the School while they have been with us.

I hope you all have a restful and relaxing holiday and a blessed Christmas. My best wishes to you all, too, for 2019, whatever that might bring. See you next year.

 

181206 tree

 Jenny Allum
Head of School

 

Pocket Awards

Girls in the Secondary School who are awarded a blazer ‘Pocket’ for excellence and outstanding achievement in a co-curricular activity are able to have their blazers embroidered only during holiday periods.

Awards will be announced at Final Assembly on Wednesday 5 December. Blazers may be left at the Student Services Reception on either that day or Thursday 6 December or otherwise no later than 1:00pm on Monday 10 December.

Students with previous awards not yet embroidered can also leave their blazers at this time, however blazers cannot be accepted after the cut-off period on Monday 10 December. Any late submissions will need to wait until the next school holidays.

Embroidery and dry cleaning will be done during the holidays and the cost will be charged to your daughter’s account.

 

 

As part of our on-going commitment to reducing waste in the school, it is timely to celebrate the efforts of the kitchen staff in the dining room. Johan, Mel and Lee have worked tirelessly to eliminate waste going to landfill from the kitchen. The talented team is sending the equivalent of a lunch box full of waste into the red landfill bin each day. This is a phenomenal effort and shows that each of us can make a difference with just a bit of effort. Congratulations to Johan, Mel and Lee.

181206 4

Susan Zipfinger and Angela Pizzinga
Maailma Environment Club Co-ordinators

 

One year ends, another begins…
It’s been another exciting and successful year of Expeditions, Residential Projects, Skill, Recreation and Service, with the girls busily and (usually) efficiently progressing toward that magical,  sought-after Duke of Edinburgh's badge. We would like to congratulate them all for their dedication, hard work, selflessness and fun approach throughout the year, and look forward to them returning next year, relaxed and revived. We encourage them to continue their activities throughout summer if possible – the surf patrols, shifts at the Vinnies store and tennis tournaments can continue to build their hours.

Please be aware that this year’s Duke of Edinburgh video is available on Clickview, so parents can get a small idea of what the girls see and do on their Expeditions.

181206 10

We both wish everyone the best possible Christmas and summer, with maybe even a bit of bushwalking or camping thrown in to keep your mind and soul grounded.

Joanne Bower and Doric Swain
D of E Co-ordinators

 

 

A Chorus Line
Congratulations to those girls who have been cast in A Chorus Line, the SCEGGS Musical in 2019. Thank you to the many girls who auditioned as the standard was very high.

Female roles have been allocated and we will be allocating roles for boys at the beginning of next term.

181206 1

 

Character Cast
Female
Bebe Benzenheimer Olivia Reed
Cassie Ferguson Teya Phillips
Connie Wong Lara Feller
Diana Morales Marie Karantanis
Jude Turner Hannah Mavrakis
Kristine Urich Nathalie Wilder
Lara Eliza Wachholz
Maggie Winslow Bonnie Harrington
Michelle Costa Millicent Fairlie
Sheila Bryant Zara Rubinsztein
Val Clark Charlotte Barnes
Ensemble Lillian Barker
Sienna Best
Isabella Habib
Imogen Holmes
Emma Kirkland
Lucie Natalizio
India Poiner
Male (roles to be allocated in Term 1)
Sebastian Carl
Hunter Cole
Zachary Fuller
Hugo Gibson
Sean Hwang
Ryan Lum
Daniel Sirmai
Reuben Wilder

 

Inga Scarlett
Head of Drama

 

 

 
Term IV - Week 8

Photograph of the Week

181206 8

Zoe Moutsopoulos
Year 8

 

Drawing of the Week

181206 9

Elenarose Plaister
Year 10

 

 

Congratulations to members of the Bugles Band in the Primary School. Last Tuesday was a lovely chance to celebrate some of their achievements. The day began with an open rehearsal, where they shared some music with parents and Year 6 students were recognised for their contribution. We also recognised four students who had 100% attendance for the ENTIRE year: congratulations to Mia Costa, Hannah Guest, Julia Richards and Alexandra West!  At lunchtime the band performed in the Primary School. They added a little Christmas cheer to the playground and Baby Shark was a popular piece to move to!

Well done to the 23 students from the studios of Jonathan Whitting, Kathryn Crossing and Dominique Gallery who achieved very pleasing results in their AMEB examinations last Friday.

Great work those students who recently performed at the Suzuki graduation concert.

Pauline Chow
Head of Music

 

 

Secondary Sport

Cycling
On Saturday Olivia Kibble rode in the 108km Letape Cycle Event in Jindabyne - run by the Tour de France. She was the sole junior female rider and rode for just over 5 hours. She conquered the Beloka Climb coming 32 out of 201 females and 153 out of 941 out of all the riders, in a ride which was described in the SMH as “brutal”. Well done Olivia on this remarkable achievement.

181206 5

 

Results from Easts Touch Grand Finals
Junior Grade B     SCEGGS 7 defeated Wenona 11 8-2 
Year 7 Grade B SCEGGS 14 lost to Loreto Kirribilli 8    
2-6
Junior Grade G SCEGGS 10 defeated Ascham 11 3-2
Senior Grade G SCEGGS 5 lost to Ascham 5 2-4
Senior Grade E SCEGGS 3 defeated Ascham 4 6-2

 181206 7SCEGGS 3

181206 sceggsSCEGGS 10

181206 6
SCEGGS 7

IGSSA Water Polo
Well done to the SCEGGS 2 team who finished equal first in Grade S06 in the IGSSA Water Polo competition. SCEGGS 4 were also runners up in Grade J07.

 

Hornsby-Kuringai District Tennis Association
Congratulations to SCEGGS 2 who finished in 1st place in Grade S7. SCEGGS 3 also finished 1st in Grade S8. Well done to all players!

 

Futsal
Well done to SCEGGS 1 Futsal team who were narrowly defeated in Senior Division 1 grand final by Kincoppal Rose Bay on Friday evening. The match a very even with the score 4-5 at the completion of the game.

 

Indoor Hockey
Good luck to our U’18 Indoor Hockey team who play in their grand final on Wednesday evening.


 Alison Gowan
Director of Sport

Primary Sport

IPSHA Years 4-6 Football 2019
On Saturday 2 February, we will have our first training session for the 2019 year at Moore Park Turf fields (Near the cnr Robertson and Lang Rd). We will also be trialling some of the girls who have had injuries this year and will decide final teams in Week 2 of Term 1.

 Time: Year 4: 8.00am-9.30am   and   Years 5 & 6: 9.30am-11.00am
Wear: SCEGGS sports uniform, shin pads, long SCEGGS socks and trainers or boots                 
(Football boots are not compulsory)
Bring: Large water bottle, sunscreen
Wet Weather In case of wet wether please check SCEGGS twitter                            
  Twitter @SCEGGSSports                                                                        

The first Tuesday training session will be on Tuesday 5 February at Moore Park Turf Fields (Near the cnr Robertson and Lang Rd). The girls will catch the bus from SCEGGS and can be picked up at 4.50pm at Moore Park or approximately 5.20pm outside the Sports Hall in Forbes Street.

Please ensure your daughter has a healthy snack, i.e. fruit or cheese and biscuits, no chips etc. and a large water bottle.

 

Year 3 Basketball 2019
Year 3 Basketball will start with two weeks of training and learning the rules of the game.

Training Dates:   Saturday 2 Feb and Saturday 9 Feb in the SCEGGS Sports Hall from 8.00am – 10.30am.            

Matches will commence on Saturday 16 Feb at SCEGGS.

Tuesday 5 Feb will be the first after school training session in the SCEGGS Sports Hall. The girls will be collected from their classroom at 3.10pm and taken to the Sports Hall. They will have a snack before commencing the session. Please ensure your daughter has a large water bottle as well.

Wear: SCEGGS Sports uniform and sport shoes

Bring: Large water bottle and healthy snack, i.e. fruit or cheese and biscuits, no chips etc.

 

Sue Phillips
Primary Sport and PDHPE Co-ordinator

 

 

This month on SchoolTV - Mindfulness
Over the last decade, mindfulness has been slowly rising in popularity with many individuals practising it on a regular basis. Evidence based research has found that there are many benefits to mindfulness. This year, a team of interested teachers from the Primary School have been working together to implement a mindfulness program across K-6. Through this program they aim to empower the girls through mindfulness to gain self-awareness, confidence, skills for self-regulation and resilience. In the Secondary School, students learn about mindfulness through the Form program and our School Psychologist, Dr Melissa Saxton, has also run mindfulness mediation with students.

Mindfulness can be described as attention training for your brain, enabling you to focus on something without judgement and to stimulate curiosity. Mindfulness can be practised in a number of ways and is something that can be done by everyone - no matter what your age! It has been practised by many cultures around the world, but it is not exclusively affiliated to any particular philosophy or religion. Mindfulness helps improve memory, engagement and performance. Its positive effect on the brain can improve immunity, mental wellbeing, learning ability, emotional health and even time management. It is especially important in this era of information overload as our attention is constantly being pulled in many directions making us more distracted.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents can learn the best way to introduce mindfulness to their children, implementing it into their daily lives to have an overall positive impact on family relationships. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition and we always welcome your feedback.

Here is the link to this month’s edition.

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Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

Head Lice
There have been cases of head lice reported in both the Primary and Secondary School. Head lice are very common in schools, and it is important that all parents check their daughter’s hair regularly and follow the necessary procedures if needed.

For further information, please refer to the NSW Health Department: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/headlice/Pages/default.aspx.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

This week, I wanted to share a few interesting articles which you might find worthwhile. Just some valuable reading when you have a spare moment!

How to help teenagers embrace stress. An article from the New York Times.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/19/well/family/how-to-help-teenagers-embrace-stress.html

How to help kids manage sleep, schoolwork and screens.
https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/52180/how-to-help-kids-manage-sleep-schoolwork-and-screens

And an interesting article from The West Australian about helping young people with resilience.
https://thewest.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/the-gift-of-resilience-ng-b88967243z

Please do let me know if you see good articles anywhere which you think might be good to share with others. We are all In This Together!

Best wishes

Jenny Allum
Head of School

Helping your daughter make the most of feedback
This week, the Secondary School is filled with the distinctive sounds of the Semester 2 exam week for Year 7-10 and Year 12 sitting more HSC exams. While this is an important week in the school calendar, in some ways the week after this is an even more important one for our girls in Year 7-10. Why you might ask? Next week is when they will start to get their exams back – and with that process comes a whole range of comments, activities and discussions which are all designed to help the girls identify those areas that have gone well and those that they haven’t quite mastered yet. This feedback step is a pivotal part in all learning – the step that can make all the difference in the future - but making the most of feedback isn’t always easy! So how can parents help?

What does good feedback look like?
Imagine the Tennis coach who says: “You won 12 of the 18 games today”. This sort of comment doesn’t do anything to help a young tennis player grow and learn. Similarly, if you only ask your daughter about a mark or grade, then you miss the opportunity for a much more helpful conversation at home.

What might a more helpful coach say? “Your first serves were spot on today – accurate and powerful. I think it’s your backhand shots that seemed to let you down – only half of them landed in. What might we do about it at practice next week?” I think this is a great example of useful feedback. Why? It identifies strengths, it highlights one area to work on (not listing every mistake), it is timely and it offers the opportunity for the learner to think about how to improve. As our girls mature as learners, we want every student to be able to look at an assessment and the feedback they have been given to be able to articulate similar insights about their academic work.

How can parents help their daughters make the most of feedback?

1. Help her notice what she might need to work on
Don’t just ask her about a mark or an average, but help her to observe and take notice of other important information too. For example, you might consider:
  • Asking her what has gone well. Ask your daughter what are the parts of the exam that she has done best in or is most proud of, perhaps in a particular section or a specific topic.
  • Reading through the teacher’s comments together. Your teacher writes here that you have done really well in the statistics questions, but also writes that some of those algebraic equations didn’t go as well.
  • Making an observation about one thing you have noticed. I notice that you have really excelled in the multiple choice questions, but it looks like you weren’t so sure about all of the terminology in the short answer section. Or just looking at your writing in this extended response, I wonder if you might have been rushing a little more towards the end?
2. Help her think about how she might improve in the future
There are lots of possible cunning plans your daughter can devise here! Sometimes she might need to do more practice; other times, she might need to practise under different circumstances (eg start a little earlier, or work more quickly, or organise things in a different way); sometimes she might just need to keep going the way she is and let increased experience work its magic. Sometimes your daughter might need some help to think through these options.

Naturally, there will also be times when it isn’t clear to your daughter what the best strategy might be – in which case your advice to her is always “why don’t you ask your teacher about how you might be able to work on that for next time?”

3. Help her be realistic about effort
"I put in sooo much effort this time and I still didn't do as well as I wanted!" We have all heard statements like this reflecting the disappointment that comes from trying, perhaps really hard, but still not achieving what we hoped for. For some children, the claim of putting in "so much effort" sometimes means "so much more than I did before", with an implied hopefulness that this new burst of energy will achieve remarkable and instantaneous results. As our kids grow up, it is important to help them learn that some things take time. None of us learned to walk overnight; it took time and perseverance and yes, a few bruises along the way. Similarly, the effects of increased effort happen over time, not overnight!

Equally important is the idea that effort is only powerful and effective when it is focused and targeted on the right things. A student who is practising the piano for five hours a week, but only playing the parts they can already play is not going to improve those tough four bars at the end! Sometimes parents can help by sitting quietly with their children to help them see that it might take a few more attempts with different amounts of effort focused on the right things before a goal is achieved.

4. Keep your results in perspective (& keep extrapolation and dramatisation to a minimum)
A mark or grade on any assessment may say something about your learning in that one specific subject ... but it tells us very little about the individual who achieved that grade! It does NOT measure the character, wit, ideas, passions, intelligence, sense of justice or compassion and everything else that makes each of us the unique individual we are. We all have a role in not over-extrapolating and not giving assessment results any broader meaning than what they actually have. Getting 40% in a History test just means you haven’t quite mastered that part of History ... yet!

Equally, a disappointing result in an English exam does not mean an individual is worthless or destined for disasters of epic proportions in the future. So parents, please help your daughter not to overdramatise. History is filled with examples of people who didn’t get things quite right the first time, but with perseverance and determination, these same individuals went on to achieve many great things. Learning to manage your own emotional response is a really important life skill for us all ... and let’s face it: getting 70% when you were really, really hoping for 80% is not the end of human civilisation as we know it!

So as your daughter talks to you next week about how her exams have gone, take the opportunity to dig a little deeper than just asking about a mark or a grade. Help her to identify her strengths in each subjects and a specific area to work on, help her think about how to improve – and help her keep it all in perspective too!

Holly Gyton
Deputy Head

 

 

SchoolTV: Exam Stress - Special Report
Keeping things in perspective for students and parents alike can help prevent everyone getting overwhelmed during examination periods. Whether this be during the HSC, or in Year 7, having some simple strategies to support your daughter can be extremely helpful. Parents can provide support, not only emotionally, but also practically by keeping their child well-nourished and encouraging physical activity. There are also many strategies that students can implement to help themselves.

Whilst this special report of SchoolTV is specifically focused on the HSC, parents will find useful tips to support their child which can be applied to any examination period. This can often be a stressful time for students and parents, and it is vitally important that a student's mental health is looked after as well as their physical health. Therefore, knowing and implementing these helpful tools as early as possible in your child’s school journey will help everyone keep assessments in perspective and better equip them to deal with the pressures of the HSC when that time comes.

We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered here and we always welcome your feedback. If you do have any concerns about your child, please contact the School for further information.

Here is the link to your special report http://sceggs.nsw.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/year-12-exam-stress-special-report.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

How to deal with perfectionism in your daughter
The suggestions in this article are only applicable if your daughter really is a perfectionist, so it is important at the start to outline what perfectionism is and what behaviours indicate perfectionism.

If your daughter:

  • wants to do well,
  • works hard and strives to improve,
  • worries about up-coming examinations and doing well,
  • is hard on herself when she doesn’t do well, and is miserable or frustrated when she doesn’t perform at her best,

these are great attributes and you have nothing to worry about! High standards are important, and those behaviours are signs that she cares about doing well, and understands that important achievements come from hard work. This is all great!

None of those attributes above signal perfectionism.

A perfectionist person might be seen to do the following, regularly and repeatedly:

  • Spend many hours on a task designed to be done in 20 minutes or so.
  • Agonise over every tiny detail of a task until everything is perfect; excessive checking and the like.
  • Start again if a little mistake is made – unable to accept the slightest flaw. Even the look of the document is important, whilst that will not be particularly important to the teacher.
  • Be unable to hand an assignment or piece of work in to the teacher unless they think it is perfect – she might prefer to get zero for a task than to hand in something less than perfect and get, say, 8 out of 10.
  • Be overly and unrealistically down on any mark less than perfect, or any constructive criticism from the teacher. Take the slightest less-good mark as a sign that they are a complete failure.
  • Be overly anxious and worried about examinations, reports, tests and assignments that they are incapable of a normal, healthy life.
  • Often procrastinating – unwilling to start something unless they know exactly how to do it perfectly.
  • Sometimes they actually give up easily – the goal of a perfect mark in a piece of work seems so daunting and impossible, they just give up very quickly – often before they start.

The above behaviours of perfectionists are actually symptoms of anxiety. A perfectionist is an anxious person – a person consumed by their own inadequacies, worried about what other people will think of them.

So, here are some thing you can do:

1. Show that you are accepting of mistakes which your daughter makes. If she brings home a piece of work to show you, upset by a mark which was less than what she wanted, or with a critical comment from the teacher, or whatever, look for the positive things in the work. Praise those behaviours you want to reward – like the effort to get it done; about how you value the good things in the work; that you think she has done a good job; and you are proud of her even if the mark isn’t perfect. You love her for who she is, not for her marks.
2. Normalise mistakes. You will help your daughter be accepting of her own mistakes if you help her to see that others (including you yourself) make mistakes, that it is part of being human, and that people are OK with making mistakes from time to time. It is good to quietly observe when others make mistakes. It’s good to reinforce that you see mistakes as opportunities to learn.
3. Make sure your rules reinforce good, non-perfectionist behaviour. For example, don’t let her stay up all night getting everything perfect on an assignment or project. Have a “homework time is over” rule, and stick to it. When enforcing that rule, make it clear that everything doesn’t have to be perfect. Of course she could do a better job on an assignment if there were 28 hours in the day! But there aren’t. And so she can only do as much as she can in the available time. Balance in life is important, good sleep is important too, as is a good social life and positive family time. So say quietly: “Homework time is over now. I know you haven’t finished, but your teacher will be happy with what you have done so far. It’s time for bed now”.
4. If your daughter is panicking over work and her inability to do it, talk quietly to her, giving calm coping statements like: “You are doing fine, darling”, “Let’s just stop for a minute and collect our thoughts”; “We love you whether you do well in your maths test or not”. “Let’s take a break while you are panicking. You can’t think straight in that state of mind. We will come back to it after a little break”. Help her to breathe regularly and deeply. It would be a good idea to do something else – have a shower, go for a walk, and then come back to the work later.
5. Reinforce good behaviour. “It was great to see you persist, even when it got really hard”. “I noticed you kept calm and asked for help in a quiet voice. Well done”. Or “I noticed that you made a mistake but kept on going, rather than starting again. I am really proud of you for that”.
6. Praise effort, not grades. If your daughter thinks that getting really high marks is important to you, then she will focus on that. If she thinks that the effort she puts into something (within reason) is important to you, then she will focus on that. Effort is more important than the final mark.
7. Be patient. It takes a long while to help a teenager overcome unhelpful perfectionism. Being calm and accepting yourself is such an important first step, but it will take a long time until you start to see some improvement. So be patient!

If some of the symptoms of perfectionism are extreme, or if they persist for a long time, you could consult a specialist – talk to your daughter’s classroom teacher or Year Co-ordinator, one of our School Counsellors, or your GP. She may need more professional help.

Good luck and best wishes for the new term!

Jenny Allum
Head of School

 

 

What tips or advice would you give our girls for all the adventures that await them beyond school?
Thank you to all the parents, staff and Old Girls who submitted a tip last week – we had a fantastic response and have many great words of wisdom from lots of different families across the SCEGGS community. So a big thank you to you all!

The tips included lots of very practical tips like get a Medicare card, clean your room, finally get your driver’s licence, learn how to load the dishwasher ... and thank your parents for all that they have done for you! Many replies also included more philosophical words to help our Year 12s as they tackle the diversity of possibilities in the years ahead – university, TAFE, apprenticeships, travel, first jobs, promotions, leadership roles, relationships, family and so much more! We also know that each and every girl will have a different journey, take different opportunities, celebrate different successes and also face diverse challenges and obstacles along the way.

So what were some of our favourites?

  • Know yourself, listen to your inner voice, have the courage to follow your heart and pursue your passions.
  • The best opportunities sometimes come from the most unexpected places – keep your eyes and minds open to the possibilities around you.
  • Be open to meeting new people in whatever you do next year and make an effort to keep in touch with old friends.
  • Eat well, sleep well and look after your health – and drive safely.
  • Know that you are well supported and support others.
  • As you enter the workforce, whether part-time or full time, don’t let anyone tell you that you have to tolerate bad behaviours like sexism. Try to change the adult world where you find it unsatisfactory!
  • Whatever job you are doing, do it well.
  • Treasure your sense of adventure and don’t be afraid to try something new – even when you’re 95!
  • Keep things in perspective – the celebrations and the times when things go wrong - and keep your sense of humour. A laugh and a smile go a long way in life.
  • Give it a go – surely a hundred passionate SCEGGS girls from the Class of 2018 could certainly give any glass ceiling a nudge?
  • Don’t live your life in a silo – actively engage with lots of different people in life, old and young, near and far, and be enriched by what you learn from them all.
  • You are you, you are unique: be yourself, enjoy yourself and make the most of you. Whatever you do, don’t waste time living someone else’s life.
  • Sometimes, just stop for a moment to be thankful for all the best things in life – your family, your friends, love, health and everything else that we are so lucky to have.

Thank you again to all members of the SCEGGS community who contributed their ideas last week. We also enjoyed the reminders to listen again to the words of advice that originally came from an essay published in the Chicago Tribune more than 20 years ago, called Wear Sunscreen, and which were also released as a song by Baz Luhrmann. Take a moment to listen again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ7AzBIJoI.

We wish all the girls in the Class of 2018 the best of luck for the HSC and all their adventures beyond the Green Gate ... and remember, once a SCEGGS girl, always a SCEGGS girl!

Holly Gyton
Deputy Head of School

 

 

As we come to the end of Term III, we also approach the time when we say farewell to the Class of 2018. Although it can be a little scary for the girls to think about life beyond classrooms, bells and school uniforms, it is also a really exciting time for them as they consider the world of diverse possibilities ahead – university, TAFE, apprenticeships, travel, first jobs, promotions, leadership roles, relationships, family and so much more! We also know that each and every girl will have a different journey, take different opportunities, celebrate different successes and also face diverse challenges and obstacles along the way.

So as our girls embark on their own adventure, we’d love to hear from lots of different members of the SCEGGS community: what tips or advice would you give to our girls in Year 12 as they walk out the Green Gate? You might like to give them some:

  • practical advice about university or starting your first job
  • a reminder about the most important things in life
  • an inspirational quote or saying that has served you well

... or any other general words of wisdom!

We’d love to hear from everyone who has a tip to share. Please just email your contributions to Holly Gyton (hollygyton@sceggs.nsw.edu.au) by Monday 17 September... and we will share our collective advice for the Class of 2018 with the whole school community in Behind the Green Gate next week.

Holly Gyton
Deputy Head of School

 

 

This month on SchoolTV - Sleep
180906 Sleep SchoolTV PromoStudents today have extremely busy schedules, with ever increasing responsibilities at school and at home. Many kids, especially adolescents, are going to bed later and later and are at risk of sleep deprivation. This affects three areas of a child’s development: psychological, physiological and psychosocial. All three are essential to a child's growth, learning ability and overall wellbeing. Sleep is vital to a child’s overall health and is as important as diet and exercise.

Sleep also strengthens a child’s immune system and supports their ability to function properly on a daily basis. Children who do not get enough sleep show increased levels of aggressive behaviour, are less attentive and are much less active. Trying to catch up on sleep on weekends is not the answer and can still lead to severe sleep deprivation.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will learn about the importance of sleep and how sleep deprivation can have adverse effects on a child’s health and wellbeing. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition and we always welcome your feedback.

Here is the link to this month’s edition http://sceggs.nsw.schooltv.me/newsletter/sleep

Past editions on the following topics are still available for you to revisit at any stage:

  • Anxiety
  • Body image
  • Eating disorders
  • Physical activity and exercise
  • Diet and nutrition
  • School transitions

We hope that you have been finding the SchoolTV resources helpful. If you do feel at all concerned about your child, please do not hesitate to contact the School.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

Here are a few interesting resources which you might find helpful:

1. A 6-minute Ted talk on grit – the power of passion and perseverance:
https://www.ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_grit_the_power_of_passion_and_perseverance
2. A podcast on parenting, featuring Carol Dweck, Stanford Professor of Psychology, which examines mindset, motivation, and parenting tips in the context of her recently receiving the Yidan Prize. (if you are time poor, the “tips” begin at around the 10-minute mark...)
https://soundcloud.com/harvardedcast/mindset-and-parenting
3. Despite the title of the article below, it’s less about technology and more about how caring for each other is an antidote to the rapid increase in anxiety among our kids and in our culture in general. It’s a nice reminder to calm down, slow down and keep mindfully moderating and restraining ours and our kid’s use of screens.
https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/slaves-to-the-god-of-technology-20180724-p4zt7z.html
4. A short, interesting article on Why Stepping Back Can Empower Kids in an anxious world
https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51693/why-stepping-back-can-empower-kids-in-an-anxious-world

Jenny Allum
Head of School

 

 

Helping your Daughter with Friends
Some of the hardest lessons children learn at school are about friendships. As adults, we know that just about all friendships have their ups and downs, and through our life experiences we have learnt how to deal with the disappointment we have all felt at some time in our relationships. But for children it can be really tough, and we know it can be heartbreaking for parents to hear their little girl talk about friendship problems she is experiencing. Instinctively, parents want to jump in and save their daughter by fixing things for her. But this could be doing more harm than good, because you can’t always be there! Parents need to be guiding their daughter through their friendships, empowering them with the confidence and skills they need to deal with things on their own.

The teachers and I regularly work with parents, helping them navigate their daughters through friendship issues. I’ll share some of our tips with you:

How to help your daughter make new friends
Not all children make friends easily, and even for those who do there will be times when her friendship circle will need broadening. Encourage your daughter to have a wide circle of friends, rather than one ‘best friend’. Few best friends last forever, and it can be gut wrenching for children when a best friend moves on.

  • Encourage your daughter to be pro-active in making friends, not wait for others to come to her. Encourage her to approach others and ask them to play or join an activity. Give her tips on what to do when meeting new people: to smile, maintain eye contact, introduce herself, ask questions. Practice with your daughter opening lines of conversations she could have when making a new friend; an opening line can be as simple as ‘What did you do on the weekend?’
  • Read stories to your daughter about making new friends. There are many available online, or speak to one of our librarians who’ll be able to help you.
  • Encourage her to be herself. Children will often adopt personas or certain characteristics hoping these will make her more attractive to new friends. It rarely works! What will attract new friends are honesty, respect, loyalty and kindness – encourage your daughter to embody these characteristics and when you see her displaying these, recognise it.
  • Encourage her to join co-curricular activities, after school or at lunch times. These activities provide children with a focus, at the same time as opportunities for social interaction, enabling children to make friends with others with similar interests. Team sports are a wonderful option, but there are also Music groups, and Art, Science and French clubs the girls can join at school.
  • Organise play dates after school, on weekends and during the holidays. While friendships can be made at school, many are fostered outside of the school day. But try and organise a mix of ‘free play’ and activity based play dates – a lot of pressure can be put on the ‘host’ child if activities aren’t organised, especially if she is struggling with friendships. And avoid having group play dates if the aim is to foster a new friendship; group play dates can backfire if sub groups form and the host can even end up feeling left out.

How to help your daughter when she’s struggling with friendships
There are all sorts of reasons why children struggle with friendships: a friend might say something mean, a child may feel left out of a group or a game, and friends move on and no longer want to be a child’s friend.

  • Help your daughter understand that no relationship is perfect, and that friendships change and that’s ok! These are messages the girls have heard through the UR Strong Friendship programme at school too.
  • Sometimes children’s struggles come from a place of jealousy – when a friend plays with someone else, when a friend achieves something your daughter hasn’t. Help her understand how she is feeling and why.
  • Listen to your daughter’s problem, and ask her questions to clarify exactly how she is feeling and why. Resist giving advice straight away! Ask her what options she has, problem solve together.
  • There are always two sides to every story; if appropriate to the situation encourage her to see things from both sides.
  • Help her learn how to recognise the difference between intentional and unintentional mean behaviour. Sometimes the girls can be over-sensitive! Help her understand that sometimes friends don’t realise their actions could be interpreted as being unkind. Teach her how to verbalise how she is feeling to her friends, in a calm way, so that they know how she is feeling and hopefully it won’t happen again. Role playing this conversation with your daughter can help.
  • Don’t make the decision for her (because she probably won’t take your advice if you do!) but help her recognise when a friendship may be negative and it’s time to move on and make new friends. Ask her if she feels comfortable with the friendship, if it makes her happy, if she can just be herself.
  • Please don’t contact the other child’s parents if there has been an incident or something has gone wrong with a friendship – this can make things worse! Always talk to us at school.
  • Encourage your daughter to talk to her teacher – they will be able to help her too!

Having positive friendships is so important for the wellbeing of children and we want all our girls to have the skills, confidence and independence to ride out the stormy aspects of friendship and enjoy everything good friendships bring. Please, do come in and talk to me, or any of your daughter’s teachers, if your daughter is ever struggling with her friends. We are here to help you, as well as your daughters!

Elizabeth Cumming
Head of Primary School

 

 

Resilience vs Rescue
I am sure that you, like us, want your daughter to leave SCEGGS as a resilient person - someone able to face challenges, solve problems and accept and learn from their mistakes. However, girls live in a world where opportunities to develop these skills can often be hard. There is no ambiguity in the lives of adolescence instead there are answers at the click of a button. If something goes wrong, they can be in contact by phone in an instant. If they are unsure of an answer, Google will help. Therefore, opportunities where problems arise and a simple Google search won’t provide the answer offer such value. Sometimes, though, it can be very difficult to ignore our desire to rescue and allow these opportunities to rise to the surface - to allow an opportunity for your daughter to develop greater resilience.

There is no doubt that in order to become more resilient we need to actually face disappointment, anger, rejection, worry and fear. However, when we rescue someone from experiencing these emotions-emotions which are a normal part of the human experience- we take away something much more valuable than the short-term emotion they feel. It is extremely empowering to solve a problem, to have moments of reflection on our successes and failures, our challenges and triumphs. These learning opportunities provide growth, build our sense of self-efficacy and ultimately help us to become more resilient in the future.

When your daughter is feeling anxious or worried, a ‘rescue’ response can often override other possible solutions. However, whilst allowing your daughter to have a day at home or giving them a chance to avoid feelings of discomfort may ease the anxiety momentarily, it can often do more harm in the long run. Anxiety is a natural (and important) emotion and failure, whether real or perceived, is unavoidable. I would also ask, what safer, more supportive place could you find to experience disappointment or failure? Of course, if your daughter’s level of anxiety is prolonged or feels disproportionate to the event, we would always encourage you to speak to us here at school.

Sometimes our desire to rescue is a response to our own distress or concern. Remembering that we have a choice how to respond and when to respond is actually very powerful. Having a series of questions you can ask which prompt your daughter (and sometimes yourself!) to develop their resilience and try to solve problems themselves first can be so helpful. For example:

  • What are three other possible outcomes?
  • How could you approach that conversation? We can role play this together if you’d like?
  • If your friend was experiencing this, what advice might you give them?

When our immediate response is to rescue someone, unconsciously we are also saying that we don’t have faith in their ability to solve the problem themselves. You do not have to respond immediately when you receive a message or phone call from your daughter. It can be hard to ignore, but remember that if there was a serious issue, the school would be in contact immediately.

Even as teachers, sometimes our initial response is to try to solve the problem a student brings to us! And whilst this is sometimes the right thing to do, we do a disservice to the young people we care for when we don’t give them the opportunity to try solve an issue themselves.

So, whilst we understand how hard it can be not to respond to that initial urge to rescue, remind yourself that resilience is something that grows with every challenging experience. By encouraging your daughter to practise resiliency it allows them to be courageous, independent and strong, and what amazing qualities to possess.

Bethany Lord
Director of Pastoral Care

 

 

Subject Selection – an opportunity to help your daughter with her ability to make decisions
The ability to make wise and informed decisions is something that does not come naturally to most young people. It is a skill that is developed through a range of experiences, both good and bad. In order to assist our girls in the development of their ability to make well informed decisions, we need to look for opportunities to have conversations with them about what a good decision making process might look like. We need to help them identify the type of questions one should ask when trying to weigh up the pros and cons of a situation or when trying to decide which option one might take when presented with a particular problem or issue.

Next week, in the Secondary school, it is Orientation Week. Students currently in Year 7 through to Year 10 will be asked to decide upon what elective subjects they would like to study in 2019. For students entering Year 8 it will be the first time that they are given an opportunity to have some say in what they are going to study, whilst students going into Year 11 will for the first time be asked to decide upon their entire pattern of study. Some girls will be very confident and definite in the choices that they wish to make. Whilst others will struggle with the decision because they are very unsure about what to do or they will worry about the consequence of making the wrong decision.

It is my opinion, that this process of subject selection presents an opportunity to have conversations with your daughter about how to reach a decision that feels right for her. It provides the perfect platform upon which to model for your daughter the need to ask questions in order to assist in the making of a good decision. What subjects do I enjoy? What am I good at? What might I like to learn more about? are some questions she should consider in trying to reach a decision about what electives to select. Additionally, other advice you could give your daughter might be for her to consider what other information she needs to gather or who she might talk to in order to find out more about particular subjects.

Making decisions about a future pattern of study may also provide you with the chance to have discussions with your daughter about making choices that are right for her, rather than for others. That is, ensuring that she is selecting a subject because it is something that she wishes to study rather than making a choice because her two best friends are selecting that subject. Discussing with your daughter, what options are right for her may provide you the chance to remind her that in some instances as young a person she will feel pressure from others to do something that she might not be comfortable about and that she should always remember that she should stick to what she feels is right for her rather than give into the pressure she might feel from those around her.

Therefore, when chatting with your daughter about what subjects she might like to study in 2019 or having this discussion at some point in the future, remember to think about using it as an opportunity to provide her with the tools to make decisions for herself. In this instance it is a safe and structured situation where there is a great deal of support for her to reach a decision with which she is comfortable. However, it might just also help develop within her the skills to make wiser decisions when she may be faced with more challenging and significant choices at some point in time.

Andrew Gallagher
Director of Curriculum

 

 

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